Marty Noble thinks you 'ought to get a life'

17 Comments Mets beat writer Marty Noble, responding to criticism of his Hall of Fame ballot:

And those who have their noses pressed against their computer screens and think VORP is a valid means of measuring a player’s performance ought to get a life and a credential that would allow them to see and hear the game up close. Then determine the players whose numbers actually contribute to winning and those who are equipped only add the next run in a 15-3 game.

In other words, anyone who likes to go beyond century-old stuff like batting averages, wins, and RBIs when evaluating a player’s performance is just a loser who can’t possibly know anything without a “credential” that allows them to watch games “up close” from inside a press box. Glad that’s settled.
If you’re curious, Noble’s ballot named two players this year: Barry Larkin and Dave Parker. And based on his unique ability “to see and hear the game up close” by way of a media credential, Noble called Parker “the best player I ever have covered.” Seriously. Parker was certainly a fine player, but I’ll take VORP over whatever credential-fueled viewpoint leads to that nonsense any day.
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Henderson Alvarez signs with Tigres de Quintana Roo

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Free agent right-hander Henderson Alvarez signed a deal with the Tigres de Quintana Roo of the Mexican Baseball League earlier this week, FanRag Sports’ Jon Heyman reported Friday. The righty wasn’t necessarily too fringey a player to hack it in the big leagues, but there were no MLB takers in attendance during his showcase in Venezuela last month and he clearly felt it best to try his luck elsewhere.

The 27-year-old’s last major league gig came with the Phillies, for whom he delivered a 4.30 ERA, 6.8 BB/9 and 3.7 SO/9 over 14 2/3 innings in 2017. While he’s not too far removed from his first and only All-Star bid in 2014, he was besieged by shoulder issues in 2015 and 2016 and underwent season-ending surgeries as a result.

That added injury risk, coupled with the fact that he hasn’t pitched more than 22 innings in a single season since 2014, may have been too much for major league teams to take on this spring. Assuming he steers clear of further injuries, however, a return to the majors may not be entirely out of the question in years to come.