Piniella announces Cubs batting order with Byrd fifth, Soriano sixth

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Speaking at the annual Cubs convention over the weekend, manager Lou Piniella revealed that new center fielder Marlon Byrd has been penciled into the No. 5 spot in the batting order and Alfonso Soriano will remain in the No. 6 spot that he filled during the second half of last season.
Soriano spent his first two-and-a-half seasons with the Cubs batting almost exclusively leadoff, but was never a particularly good fit there. Not only is he a high-strikeout free-swinger with a sub par .328 career on-base percentage, batting atop the lineup limited his RBI chances and often wasted Soriano’s power. He’s a better fit in the sixth spot, but my guess is that he’ll eventually end up hitting fifth behind Derrek Lee and Aramis Ramirez while Byrd slides down in the order.
Signed to a three-year, $15 million deal last month, Byrd has hit fifth in 18 percent of his career starts and saw plenty of action there for the Rangers. However, in three years with Texas he hit a modest .281/.328/.414 away from the Rangers’ offense-boosting home ballpark and prior to 2009 his career-high was 10 homers. Signing the 32-year-old Byrd to a three-year deal with the expectation that he’ll be a good defensive center fielder and productive No. 5 hitter for the life of the contract is going to leave the Cubs disappointed.

David Price had a rocky rehab start last night

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Red Sox starter David Price has been rehabbing a left elbow injury since early March. Last night he made his latest rehab outing for Triple-A Pawtucket. It didn’t go well.

Price allowed six runs — three earned — on seven hits in three and two-thirds innings, requiring 89 pitches to do it. His velocity was good, but otherwise it was a night to forget. This was supposed to be Price’s last rehab start before returning to the Sox’ big league rotation, but one wonders if he’s ready for it.

Price didn’t talk to the media after the game, but Pawtucket’s manager said he was “upbeat” and “felt good.” For his part, John Farrell, upon hearing about the outing, said this:

“There’s no announcement at this point. We’ve got to sit with him and talk about what’s best for him, best for us as we move forward.”

The Sox could really use Price back in the rotation given their injury problems, but rushing him back if he’s not ready is certainly not ideal.

Stay tuned.

A security guard takes a ball from a little kid at the Braves-Pirates game

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This is not a great look.

Last night, during the Pirates-Braves game in Atlanta, Braves third baseman Rio Ruiz hit a ball fair past first base. When it got down the right field line an adult fan reached over the railing and grabbed it. As the ball was still in play that was fan interference. A security guard came down and, quite justifiably, told the fan that he had to leave the park. You can’t do that, man.

The problem, however, is that before the guard got there the fan gave the ball to a little kid. It looks like it may have been his little kid, though we don’t know. The security guard wasn’t having that, and demanded and took the ball from the kid:

I imagine he was thinking “hey, I can’t let this interfering fan keep his ball and if his kid is getting it, it’s like HE’S keeping it!” But really, dude, take a step back. That ball was going to go into a big bucket for batting practice at best. No one was going to take it and sell it for hundreds of dollars as a “genuine Rio Ruiz game-hit ball!” The “fruit of the poisonous tree” doctrine really doesn’t have a place here.

Braves announcer Joe Simpson was, for once, talking a lot of sense:

“Have some common sense there, fella, give the ball back to the young man. Give the ball back to the kid. He’s not the one that messed up.”

I hope someone with the Braves made that right. Even if the adult was a dingus here, the kid was as excited as hell for that ball. Letting him have it wouldn’t have encouraged more people to be dinguses and interfere with balls.

UPDATE: Yep, the Braves made it right:

Good on them.