Major League Baseball is getting angry at Tom Hicks

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While everyone keeps assuming that the sale of the Texas Rangers to the Greenberg Group is imminent and that no one should be worrying, the fact is that the Friday deadline has come and gone and there’s still no deal.  Could last month’s report of financial difficulties be the problem? Or is it something new? Jon Heyman reports that all isn’t as rosy as everyone wants it to seem, and the problem is Tom Hicks, who is acting as both seller and (minority) buyer in this deal:

But MLB has about had it with Hicks, and top officials say they may
soon take over the sale of the team, which potentially could bring the
other two hopeful buyers back into the picture, those being Houston
businessman Jim Crane, and former agent, and current White Sox executive, Dennis Gilbert, who has appeared to be baseball’s top choice from the start. The sale
price is expected to be $570 million, according to sources. One
impediment to a deal has been Hicks’ insistence upon maintaining
significant power even after collecting the sale proceeds. Greenberg’s
big edge had been that he was willing to allow Hicks to remain as a
board member who’d attend owners meetings.

MLB fronted Hicks millions in order to meet payroll and expenses last summer.  One wonders, based on what Heyman is saying, what kinds of strings were attached to that deal. Could they just step in and make the deal with Greenberg — or call Crane or Gilbert — against Hicks’ wishes?

Joe Maddon: “I have a defensive foot fetish.”

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The Cubs’ defense — or lack thereof this year — has been a topic of conversation as it could help explain why the team hasn’t played at the elite level it played at last year.

Manager Joe Maddon tried to go into detail about that but ended up channeling his inner Rex Ryan. Via CSN Chicago’s Patrick Mooney.

Well then.

The Nationals have scored 62 runs during four Joe Ross starts

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If, in the future, Joe Ross ever complains about a lack of run support, point to his first four starts of the 2017 season.

Ross started on April 19 in Atlanta against the Braves, on April 25 in Colorado against the Rockies, on April 30 at home against the Mets, and on May 23 at home against the Mariners. In those games, the Nats’ offense scored 14, 15, 23, and 10 runs respectively for a total of 62 runs, or an average of 15.5 per start. Ross was the pitcher of record for seven, eight, 10, and 10 runs for a total of 35 runs (8.75 runs per start), which would still make him the major league leader in run support by that restrictive standard.

Among qualified starters — Ross did not qualify — entering Tuesday’s action, the Rockies’ Antonio Senzatela led the way according to ESPN, averaging 7.11 runs of support in nine starts. The Rockies scored double-digit runs in only three of those starts, oddly enough.

Per the Nationals, the 62 runs of support for Ross is a major league record in a pitcher’s first four starts of a season.