Indians acquire Bixler from Pirates

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Clearing a 40-man roster spot for Brendan Donnelly, the Pirates on Monday traded infielder Brian Bixler to the Indians for fellow infielder Jesus Brito.
The Pirates looked at Bixler as the most expendable player on their roster, and they had made it clear he wasn’t in their 2010 plans after they signed Bobby Crosby, giving them four veteran middle infielders on major league deals.
Bixler, 27, hit .275/.343/.439 for Triple-A Indianapolis last season. He actually had a rather remarkable major league line, as he managed to bat .227 despite striking out 26 times in 44 at-bats. He was 10-for-18 with five doubles when he put the ball in play.
Overall, Bixler has hit .178/.238/.237 in 152 at-bats as a major leaguer. He’s a below average defensive shortstop, but a pretty good second baseman. He needs to really step it up if he’s going to have a career as a utilityman. The Indians could keep him as their second baseman against left-handers if they decide Jason Donald would benefit from more Triple-A time.
Brito, primarily a third baseman, hit .353/.431/.567 in 224 at-bats between the Arizona and New York-Penn Leagues last season, but as a 21-year-old, he was quite a bit older than most of the competition he was facing. The Indians didn’t view him as one of their better infield prospects.

Joe Maddon: “I have a defensive foot fetish.”

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The Cubs’ defense — or lack thereof this year — has been a topic of conversation as it could help explain why the team hasn’t played at the elite level it played at last year.

Manager Joe Maddon tried to go into detail about that but ended up channeling his inner Rex Ryan. Via CSN Chicago’s Patrick Mooney.

Well then.

The Nationals have scored 62 runs during four Joe Ross starts

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If, in the future, Joe Ross ever complains about a lack of run support, point to his first four starts of the 2017 season.

Ross started on April 19 in Atlanta against the Braves, on April 25 in Colorado against the Rockies, on April 30 at home against the Mets, and on May 23 at home against the Mariners. In those games, the Nats’ offense scored 14, 15, 23, and 10 runs respectively for a total of 62 runs, or an average of 15.5 per start. Ross was the pitcher of record for seven, eight, 10, and 10 runs for a total of 35 runs (8.75 runs per start), which would still make him the major league leader in run support by that restrictive standard.

Among qualified starters — Ross did not qualify — entering Tuesday’s action, the Rockies’ Antonio Senzatela led the way according to ESPN, averaging 7.11 runs of support in nine starts. The Rockies scored double-digit runs in only three of those starts, oddly enough.

Per the Nationals, the 62 runs of support for Ross is a major league record in a pitcher’s first four starts of a season.