Omar Minaya admits there's a problem with "the process"

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Mets general manager Omar Minaya quickly tried to smooth things over
with Carlos Beltran after the team publicly expressed their displeasure
in his decision to undergo surgery on his right knee this week, telling
David Waldstein of the New York Times that the whole controversy may have stemmed from a miscommunication of protocol:

“It was a very good conversation. Everything is fine. Listen, we have no problems with Carlos Beltran. I
have no problem with him and ownership has no problem. We love him. The
only issue was with the process, not the player.”

It’s a very telling quote. While he is speaking in reference to a very
specific instance, it only confirms the perception of dysfunction in
the organization’s leadership structure. For example, assistant general manager
John Ricco conducted the conference call on Thursday instead of Minaya, increasing speculation that the current general manager has been marginalized.
More broadly, the decision to make the dispute public has done more
harm than good in the eyes of the fanbase and public at large. Both
prompt the question: Exactly who is steering this troubled and overpriced ship?

On a related note, Sam Page of Amazin’ Avenue has put together an amusing, yet sadly-accurate flow chart of the team‘s decision-making practices.

Mets invite Tim Tebow to spring training

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Tim Tebow isn’t letting go of his major league dreams just yet. The former NFL quarterback is slated to appear with the Mets during spring training this year, extending what initially looked like an ill-fated career choice for at least one more season. Per the club’s official announcement on Friday, he’ll join a group of spring training invitees that includes top-30 prospects like Peter Alonso, P.J. Conlon, Patrick Mazeika and David Thompson.

Tebow, 30, hasn’t taken to professional baseball as gracefully as expected. He batted a cumulative .226/.309/.347 with eight home runs and a .656 OPS in 486 plate appearances for Single-A Columbia and High-A St. Lucie in 2017. While that wasn’t enough to compel the Mets to give the aging outfielder a big league tryout, there’s no denying that Tebow brought substantial benefit to their minor league affiliates — in the form of increased attendance figures and ticket sales, that is.

Even after the Mets were booted from the NL East race last September, they resisted the idea of promoting Tebow for a late-season attendance boost of their own. That’s not to say they’re planning on taking the same approach in 2018; Tebow will undoubtedly get his cup of coffee in the majors at some point, but for now, a Grapefruit League tryout is likely as close as he’ll ever get to playing with the team’s big league roster on an everyday basis.