There are 11 minutes of action in an entire football game

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The next time your football fan friends talk about how boring baseball is, shoot them this link:

According to a Wall Street Journal study of four recent broadcasts,
and similar estimates by researchers, the average amount of time the
ball is in play on the field during an NFL game is about 11 minutes.
In other words, if you tally up everything that happens between the
time the ball is snapped and the play is whistled dead by the
officials, there’s barely enough time to prepare a hard-boiled egg . . . the ratio of inaction to action is approximately 10 to 1.

Seventeen minutes are devoted to replays. Commercials take between an hour and seventy-five minutes, or 60% of the broadcast.  Sixty-seven minutes are devoted to players standing around and broadcasters bleating about whatever it is broadcasters bleat about.

I’m curious about what the ratios are for baseball. It obviously depends on what you count as dead time.  I would count the time after the batter is actually in the
box and the pitcher is getting the signs as “action,” because the ball is technically live and there’s something valuable and observable happening then, but many might not.

In fact, football partisans may point out the difficulty in determining the difference between action and inaction in a baseball game as even more damning than their own game’s pitiful ratio.  Tomato-tomahto.  Ultimately, arguing football vs. baseball is like religion or politics and facts kinda stop mattering at some point.

But one thing is indisputable: baseball is better than football in every conceivable way.  You can look it up.

Report: Athletics sign Trevor Cahill to one-year deal

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Free agent right-hander Trevor Cahill reportedly has a one-year deal in place with the Athletics, according to’s Jane Lee. The exact terms have yet to be disclosed, and as the agreement is still pending a physical, it has not been formally announced by the club.

Cahill, 30, is coming off of a decent, albeit underwhelming year with the Padres and Royals. He kicked off the 2017 season with a 4-3 record in 11 starts for the Padres, then split his time between the rotation and bullpen after a midseason trade to the Royals. By the end of the year, the righty led the league with 16 wild pitches and had racked up a 4.93 ERA, 4.8 BB/9 and 9.3 SO/9 in 84 innings for the two teams.

The A’s found themselves in desperate need of rotation depth this week after Jharel Cotton announced he’d miss the 2018 season to undergo Tommy John surgery. Right now, the team is considering some combination of Andrew Triggs, Daniel Gossett, Daniel Mengden and Paul Blackburn for the back end of the rotation — a mix that seems unlikely to change in the last two weeks before Opening Day, as Lee points out that Cahill won’t be ready to shoulder a full workload by then. Instead, he’s expected to begin the year in the bullpen and work his way up to a starting role, where the A’s hope he’ll replicate the All-Star numbers he produced with them back in 2010.