Gossage on PED users in the Hall: "I really don't know what we'd do"

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Goose Gossage.jpgSo earlier I asked if someone had Rich Gossage’s cell.
Seems someone did, and I just got off the phone with the Goose.  Nicest
guy in the world, by the way. If you’re going to talk to a Hall of Fame
reliever today, I highly recommend that you make it Gossage.

Anyway, the reason I called him was because I wanted to know, in light of his feelings on Mark McGwire and other steroid users,
what he’d think if Jose Canseco was proven right and we found out that
a current member of the Baseball Hall of Fame used performance
enhancing drugs. And Gossage was honest: he has no idea.

“I don’t really know what I’d do,” Gossage said.  “We’d have to find
out all the facts,” he said. “It’s a big dark cloud. I don’t know what
the scenario would look like.”

Gossage went on to say that it would probably depend on what the
writers did going forward with steroid users like Barry Bonds and Roger
Clemens — guys who are sure shot Hall of Famers if they hadn’t used. 
“If they let in some of those guys, I guess things are different.  What
I said about integrity yesterday still stands, but as for the Hall,
we’d have to see how the writers handled it. I can only speak for what
I believe.”

Gossage wouldn’t speculate about whether it would be appropriate to
remove someone from the Hall of Fame.  And though I didn’t ask him, he
volunteered that he has no idea what member, if any, could have
possibly used steroids, and doesn’t know one way or the other if anyone
had (he wouldn’t comment on the issue of Canseco’s credibility).

To date, no member of the Hall has ever been de-inducted, as it were,
and I could find nothing that suggests that the Hall even has a
procedure for doing so. Of course, if they wanted to, the Hall could
simply call a meeting of its board and make a rule in about five
minutes.  But let’s face it: if the Football Hall of Fame hasn’t taken
out O.J., what are the odds that the Baseball Hall of Fame would remove
a juicer?

But back to Gossage, who was gracious enough to chat with me a bit
longer than I thought he might:  He thinks that there’s a difference
between drugs of abuse and performance enhancing drugs.  He says “Dave
Parker was one of the top five baseball players I ever played with.” He
does not think that his — or Tim Raines or any other player’s —
cocaine use should be held against them in Hall of Fame voting. 
“Parker belongs,” he said. “What he did, with the cocaine, that
decreased his performance, it didn’t enhance it. If he hadn’t done that
stuff we wouldn’t be having this conversation.”  Gossage clearly thinks Parker would have been a first ballot Hall of Famer absent his mid-career cocaine-induced swoon.

“It all boils down to one word: integrity,” Gossage said.  “When it
comes to steroids, you have to talk about the records, and records are
something huge.  The home run record is the greatest record there is.”

I had to ask, of course: is Aaron still the home run king?  “In my mind
he is.  Not only was he the best. But look at where he came from. All
he did. That’s a Hall of Famer.”

I came away from our conversation with the impression that Goose
Gossage is a reasonable and level-headed guy when it comes to this
stuff. He believes what he believes, but he knows others disagree. 
He’s not out to moralize on the subject or tell others what to think.

It’s easy to get the opposite impression of the man, however, from
reading some of the reporting about him that we’ve seen in past couple
of years.  Some of that stuff has made him look like a fire-breather on
the subject of Hall of Fame standards in general and steroids in
particular. It’s enough to make one wonder if the writers who have
elicited all of those juicy quotes from him are trying to make him seem
more of a crusader than he really is.

To me he just seems sensible. But then again, he’s from Colorado, and I’ve never known anyone from Colorado who was anything but sensible.

Pirates recall pitcher Glasnow to start against Phillies

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PITTSBURGH — Right-hander Tyler Glasnow has been recalled from Class AAA Indianapolis and will make his second major league start Saturday when he faces the Philadelphia Phillies.

Glasnow lost to the Cardinals at St. Louis on July 7, allowing four runs in 5 1/3 innings. He was 7-3 with a 1.94 ERA in 18 starts with Indianapolis.

Catcher Elias Diaz was also recalled from Indianapolis while right-handed reliever AJ Schugel was optioned to the same club. Catcher Eric Fryer was placed on the paternity list after his wife gave birth to twins – a boy and a girl – on Saturday.

The 25-year-old Diaz underwent arthroscopic right elbow surgery May 3 after being injured in spring training. He has played in a combined 12 games at three minor leagues, hitting .341, after making his major league debut with the Pirates last September.

Adams homers in 16th to lift Cardinals over Dodgers 4-3

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ST. LOUIS — Matt Adams homered in the 16th inning to lead the Cardinals to a 4-3 win over the Los Angeles Dodgers on Friday night for St. Louis’ season-best fifth straight victory.

It was the second consecutive game that the Cardinals won in their final at-bat. They beat the Padres on Thursday after scoring a run in the ninth inning.

Adams homer came with one out off Bud Norris (5-9), who gave up six runs as a starter in an 8-1 loss at Washington on Wednesday.

Seth Maness (1-2) picked up the win with a scoreless inning of relief for St. Louis, which was playing its longest game of the season.

Jedd Gyorko hit a two-out homer off closer Kenley Jansen in the ninth to tie the game 3-3.

Justin Turner and Howie Kendrick homered for the Dodgers. Los Angeles has lost four of six. The red-hot Turner has seven homers and 17 RBI this month. He hit two homers in a 6-3 win over Washington on Thursday.

Turner blasted his career-high 18th homer of the season off Seung Hwan Oh in the ninth to break a 2-2 tie.

Corey Seager had four hits and drove in the first run of the game. He had hit in seven successive at-bats before flying out in the ninth.

Kendrick’s solo shot in the sixth tied the game 2-2. He has hit in 14 successive games trying Colorado’s Charlie Blackmon for the longest current streak in the majors.

Los Angeles starter Brandon McCarthy allowed one hit and two runs over 6 1-3 innings, the longest of his four starts this season. He left with leg cramps. McCarthy struck out four and walked three.

St. Louis starter Michael Wacha allowed two runs on 10 hits in six innings. He struck out four and walked one.

Dodgers reliever Adam Liberatore recorded his 28th successive scoreless outing by retiring two of four batters in the seventh. He has not allowed a run in 41 of 42 appearances this season.