Congress is not going to get involved in the McGwire business

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I only mention this because, just like the will-Bonds-be-the-next-to-apologize thing, tons of people are asking me if I think Congress will get back into the steroids thing in light of Mark McGwire’s admission.

No and no.

The first no is based on the legalities involved. The only reason they’d have to haul McGwire back or to have him investigated or what have you is for perjury. Anyone who spent any time looking back at the tapes of McGwire’s 2005 testimony, however, quickly realizes that there’s no basis for even the suggestion of perjury. He didn’t say anything. If there was any hope at all that he’d be legally scrutinized over his statements, that hope was dashed when the House committee refused to follow up or compel him to either testify or take the Fifth Amendment.   You can view this one of two ways: (1) Congress abdicating its duty to find the facts it purported to be trying to find that day; or (2) Congress tacitly acknowledging that the purpose of that hearing was grandstanding and nothing more. Either way, the ship has sailed.

The second no comes from the statements of the two men in charge of that hearing, Committee chair Tom Davis and ranking Democrat Henry Waxman.  First Davis:

”He looked ridiculous to most of the public, but he didn’t have many
good options. We put him in a pretty tight spot. He was candid and
honest in our interrogation of him.”

Some interrogation. I’ve seen Larry King get tougher on a Gabor sister.  Here’s Waxman:

“Mark McGwire is doing the right thing by telling the truth about his
steroid use. His statement sends an important message to kids about the
importance of avoiding steroids.”

Congress should never have gotten involved in this in the first place. They did anyway, but at least now, at long last, they realize that it’s time to stay out of it.

Cardinals place Dexter Fowler and Kevin Siegrist on the disabled list

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The Cardinals announced a handful of roster moves ahead of Sunday night’s game against the Pirates. Outfielder Dexter Fowler and pitcher Kevin Siegrist were placed on the 10-day disabled list with a right heel spur and a cervical spine strain, respectively. Outfielder Chad Huffman was optioned to Triple-A Memphis. The club recalled outfielder Randal Grichuk and pitcher Mike Mayers and purchased the contract of first baseman Luke Voit from Memphis.

Fowler, 31, apparently suffered his heel injury during Saturday’s game against the Pirates. He had previously missed a few games due to a quadriceps injury. He’s currently hitting .245/.336/.481 with 13 home runs and 35 RBI in 277 plate appearances.

Grichuk, 25, struggled to a .222/.276/.377 triple-slash line over his first 46 games in the big leagues, so the Cardinals sent him down to Triple-A. In 14 games with Memphis, Grichuk hit three doubles and six home runs.

Voit, 25, has crushed Triple-A pitching so far this season, batting .322/.406/.561 with 12 home runs and 48 RBI in 293 PA. He may see the occasional start at first base, but he’ll be used mostly as a bench bat.

Roberto Osuna reveals he has been dealing with an anxiety issue

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Blue Jays closer Roberto Osuna recently revealed that he has been dealing with an anxiety issue, Rob Longley of the Toronto Star reports. Osuna specified that the issue is completely off the field, not on the field.

Osuna had been feeling “a little bit anxious, a little bit weird” and said, “I feel like I’m lost a little bit right now.” Despite the anxiety, Osuna volunteered to pitch during Friday’s loss to the Royals, but the Blue Jays smartly chose not to put him into the game.

Osuna said, “I wish I knew how to get out of here and how to get out of this. We’re working on it. We’re trying to find ways to see what can make me feel better. But to be honest I just don’t know.”

It must have been tough for Osuna to make his issue public, as there is still a stigma around dealing with mental issues. Given the prominent position he holds in the Jays’ bullpen, fans become even less empathetic about taking time off to deal with it as well. Hopefully, Osuna is able to use the time off to get the help he needs. And hopefully his going public helps motivate other people dealing with mental issues to seek help for themselves.

The 22-year-old recently became the youngest player in major league history to reach 75 career saves. This season, Osuna is carrying a 2.48 ERA with 19 saves and a 37/3 K/BB ratio in 39 innings.

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Update: Osuna pitched the ninth inning of an 8-2 ballgame on Sunday and got all three Royals out on strikeouts.