Congress is not going to get involved in the McGwire business

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I only mention this because, just like the will-Bonds-be-the-next-to-apologize thing, tons of people are asking me if I think Congress will get back into the steroids thing in light of Mark McGwire’s admission.

No and no.

The first no is based on the legalities involved. The only reason they’d have to haul McGwire back or to have him investigated or what have you is for perjury. Anyone who spent any time looking back at the tapes of McGwire’s 2005 testimony, however, quickly realizes that there’s no basis for even the suggestion of perjury. He didn’t say anything. If there was any hope at all that he’d be legally scrutinized over his statements, that hope was dashed when the House committee refused to follow up or compel him to either testify or take the Fifth Amendment.   You can view this one of two ways: (1) Congress abdicating its duty to find the facts it purported to be trying to find that day; or (2) Congress tacitly acknowledging that the purpose of that hearing was grandstanding and nothing more. Either way, the ship has sailed.

The second no comes from the statements of the two men in charge of that hearing, Committee chair Tom Davis and ranking Democrat Henry Waxman.  First Davis:

”He looked ridiculous to most of the public, but he didn’t have many
good options. We put him in a pretty tight spot. He was candid and
honest in our interrogation of him.”

Some interrogation. I’ve seen Larry King get tougher on a Gabor sister.  Here’s Waxman:

“Mark McGwire is doing the right thing by telling the truth about his
steroid use. His statement sends an important message to kids about the
importance of avoiding steroids.”

Congress should never have gotten involved in this in the first place. They did anyway, but at least now, at long last, they realize that it’s time to stay out of it.

Joe Maddon: “I have a defensive foot fetish.”

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The Cubs’ defense — or lack thereof this year — has been a topic of conversation as it could help explain why the team hasn’t played at the elite level it played at last year.

Manager Joe Maddon tried to go into detail about that but ended up channeling his inner Rex Ryan. Via CSN Chicago’s Patrick Mooney.

Well then.

The Nationals have scored 62 runs during four Joe Ross starts

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If, in the future, Joe Ross ever complains about a lack of run support, point to his first four starts of the 2017 season.

Ross started on April 19 in Atlanta against the Braves, on April 25 in Colorado against the Rockies, on April 30 at home against the Mets, and on May 23 at home against the Mariners. In those games, the Nats’ offense scored 14, 15, 23, and 10 runs respectively for a total of 62 runs, or an average of 15.5 per start. Ross was the pitcher of record for seven, eight, 10, and 10 runs for a total of 35 runs (8.75 runs per start), which would still make him the major league leader in run support by that restrictive standard.

Among qualified starters — Ross did not qualify — entering Tuesday’s action, the Rockies’ Antonio Senzatela led the way according to ESPN, averaging 7.11 runs of support in nine starts. The Rockies scored double-digit runs in only three of those starts, oddly enough.

Per the Nationals, the 62 runs of support for Ross is a major league record in a pitcher’s first four starts of a season.