Congress is not going to get involved in the McGwire business

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I only mention this because, just like the will-Bonds-be-the-next-to-apologize thing, tons of people are asking me if I think Congress will get back into the steroids thing in light of Mark McGwire’s admission.

No and no.

The first no is based on the legalities involved. The only reason they’d have to haul McGwire back or to have him investigated or what have you is for perjury. Anyone who spent any time looking back at the tapes of McGwire’s 2005 testimony, however, quickly realizes that there’s no basis for even the suggestion of perjury. He didn’t say anything. If there was any hope at all that he’d be legally scrutinized over his statements, that hope was dashed when the House committee refused to follow up or compel him to either testify or take the Fifth Amendment.   You can view this one of two ways: (1) Congress abdicating its duty to find the facts it purported to be trying to find that day; or (2) Congress tacitly acknowledging that the purpose of that hearing was grandstanding and nothing more. Either way, the ship has sailed.

The second no comes from the statements of the two men in charge of that hearing, Committee chair Tom Davis and ranking Democrat Henry Waxman.  First Davis:

”He looked ridiculous to most of the public, but he didn’t have many
good options. We put him in a pretty tight spot. He was candid and
honest in our interrogation of him.”

Some interrogation. I’ve seen Larry King get tougher on a Gabor sister.  Here’s Waxman:

“Mark McGwire is doing the right thing by telling the truth about his
steroid use. His statement sends an important message to kids about the
importance of avoiding steroids.”

Congress should never have gotten involved in this in the first place. They did anyway, but at least now, at long last, they realize that it’s time to stay out of it.

Yasmany Tomas arrested for reckless driving and criminal speeding

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KTAR News is reporting that Diamondbacks outfielder Yasmany Tomas was arrested on Thursday morning for driving faster than 100 MPH, according to the Arizona Department of Public Safety. He was charged with reckless driving and criminal speeding.

The maximum sentence for a criminal speeding charge is up to 30 days in jail and a fine up to $500. It is considered a Class 3 misdemeanor. Tomas may also have his license suspended.

A Diamondbacks spokesperson said, “We are very disappointed to learn of this news. We are still gathering facts, and will refrain from further comment at this time as this is a pending legal matter.”

Tomas, 27, signed a six-year, $68.5 million contract with the Diamondbacks in December 2014 as an amateur free agent out of Cuba. He has mostly disappointed, owning a .769 OPS while playing subpar defense in the outfield as well as at third base, where the club briefly tried him. He battled a groin injury for most of the past season and ultimately underwent core muscle surgery in August.