REPORT: Chapman agrees to $30 mil. deal with Reds

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2:46 P.M.: Jeff Blair of the Toronto Globe and Mail is confirming that it is indeed the Reds. Given how late the Jays were in the hunt, they, and thus he, would probably be in a position to know.  UPDATE: Jeff Passan, who had the original report, confirms as well.

1:56 P.M: Surprise! It looks like it’s the Reds. Passan first narrowed it down to an NL Central team and then adds that a flight left Ft. Lauderdale for Cincinnati this morning. A source tells Passan it’s a $30 mil. deal over five years. Stay tuned for confirmation.
 
12:42 P.M.: There’s a tweet circulating from someone claiming to be Jeff Passan of Yahoo! Sports that says the following:

Cuban LHP Aroldis
Chapman agrees to $30M deal with National League team, according to
source. Left Ft. Lauderdale airport this a.m. to sign.

I’m posting this with the caveat that the account was just created and people have been burned with similar reports in the past.

Just a little background while we wait on the validity of this report, the Blue Jays and Angels have emerged as the front-runners for the Cuban left-hander in recent weeks. The Marlins made an offer to Chapman, but hoped that South Florida, and not cash, could make the difference in negotiations. The Reds were floated as a possibility by Ken Rosenthal as recently as Friday.

Update: Apologies to Passan, as the account appears to be real. In a report for Yahoo! Sports, Passan has no update on the possible team, but writes that the Astros and Nationals sent their general managers to the workout for Houston last month. He also notes that the Mets and recently, the Reds have expressed interest in the 21-year-old southpaw.


It’s the tenth anniversary of the biggest rout in baseball history

Associated Press
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Ten years ago today the Rangers and the Orioles squared off at Camden Yards. The Orioles built a 3-0 lead after three innings and then all hell broke loose.

The Rangers scored thirty (30!) unanswered runs via a five-spot in the fourth, a nine-spot in the sixth, a ten-spot in the eighth and a six-spot in the ninth. That was . . . a lot of spots.

Two Rangers players — Jarrod Saltalamacchia and Ramon Vazquez — hit two homers and drove in seven runs a piece. The best part: they were the eighth and ninth hitters in the lineup. There was plenty of offense to go around, however as David Murphy went 5-for-7 and scored five times. Travis Metcalf hit a pinch-hit grand slam. Marlon Byrd drove in four. It was a bloodbath, with Texas rattling out 29 hits and walking eight times.

On the Orioles side of things, Daniel Cabrera took the loss, giving up six runs on nine hits in five innings. That’s not a terribly unusual line for a bad day at the office for a pitcher — someone will probably get beat up like that in the next week or so — but the Orioles’ relievers really added to the party. Brian Burres was the first victim, allowing eight runs on eight hits in only two-thirds of an inning. Rob Bell gave up seven in an inning and a third. Paul Shuey wore the rest of it, allowing nine runs on seven hits over the final two.

The best part of the insanely busy box score, however, was not from any of the Orioles pitchers or any of the Rangers hitters. Nope, it was from a Rangers relief pitcher named Wes Littleton. You probably don’t remember him, as he only pitched in 80 games and never appeared in the big leagues after 2008. But on this day — the day of the biggest blowout in baseball history — Wes Littleton notched a save. From Baseball-Reference.com:

Three innings and 43 pitches is a lot of work for a reliever and, per the rules, it’s a save, regardless of the margin when he entered the game. Still, this was not exactly a game that was ever in jeopardy.

When it went down, way back on August 22, 2007, it inspired me to write a post at my old, defunct independent baseball blog, Shysterball, arguing about how to change the save rule. Read it if you want, but know that (1) no one has ever paid attention to such proposals in baseball, even if such proposals are frequently offered; and (2) the hypothetical examples I use to illustrate the point involve an effective Joba Chamberlain and Joe Torre’s said use of him, which tells you just how long ago this really was.

Oh, one final bit: this massacre — the kind of game that the Orioles likely wanted to leave, go back home and go to sleep afterward — was only the first game of a doubleheader. Yep, they had to strap it on and play again, with the game starting at 9PM Eastern time. Baltimore lost that one too, 9-7, concluding what must have been one of the longest days any of the players involved had ever had at the office, both figuratively and literally.

Hall of Fame baseball announcer Rafael ‘Felo’ Ramirez dies

Associated Press
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MIAMI (AP) Rafael “Felo” Ramirez, a Hall of Fame baseball radio broadcaster who was the signature voice for millions of Spanish-speaking sports fans over three decades, has died. He was 94.

The Miami Marlins announced Ramirez’ death Tuesday.

Ramirez, who died Monday night, began his broadcasting career in Cuba in 1945 before calling 31 All-Star games and World Series in Spanish. He was the Marlins Spanish-language announcer since their inaugural season in 1993 and was inducted into baseball’s Hall of Fame in 2001.

He was known for an expressive, yet low-key style and his signature strike call of “Essstrike.”

Several Spanish-language broadcasters, including Amury Pi-Gonzanez of the Seattle Mariners and San Francisco Giants, have admitted to emulating his style.