When will Erik Bedard be ready to pitch?

Leave a comment

Thumbnail image for bedard.jpgWe haven’t heard much from the Erik Bedard camp this winter. After
undergoing shoulder surgery last August there have been some
wide-ranging opinions on when he’ll be ready to to pitch in the majors
again. Some say it could be as early as May, while others have
suggested it could be mid-season.

Orioles president Andy MacPhail is one of the more optimistic ones:

“Like any free-agent signing, whether it would be Erik or anybody,
they’d have to take a physical before so we could try to get a sense,”
MacPhail said. “I think our guys feel like, based on medical stuff
they’ve seen so far, it’s sooner as opposed to later.”

Of course, MacPhail traded Bedard to the Mariners in February of
2008 for Adam Jones, George Sherrill, Chris Tillman, Kam Mickolio and
Tony Butler. Yikes, after the Orioles swapped Sherrill for third base
prospect Josh Bell last July, this trade just keeps looking worse for
Seattle. We’re talking the potential for historically bad. Long live
Bill Bavasi!

Speaking of oft-injured pitchers, MacPhail requested the medical
records for free agent right-hander Ben Sheets, but never received
them. That’s probably a sign that he won’t pitch for them.

Giancarlo Stanton stared down Derek Jeter and Michael Hill to get to New York

Getty Images

Everyone knows that Giancarlo Stanton is now a New York Yankee. Everyone knows the Marlins traded him to New York. Most people also know that, before that trade happened, the Cardinals and Giants had deals in place for Stanton that he rejected via his no-trade clause. Now, for the first time, we get some real flavor of how all of that went down from Stanton’s perspective, courtesy of this profile of Stanton’s eventful offseason from Ben Reiter of Sports Illustrated.

The best part of it comes when Derek Jeter and Marlins president Michael Hill had a sit down with Stanton while the Giants and Cardinals offers were pending. In that meeting, Reiter reports, Stanton was told in no uncertain terms that he’d either accept one of those deals or else he’d be stuck in Miami while the roster was dismantled. Stanton responded thusly:

“This is not going to go how you guys think it will go,” Stanton said. “I’m not going to be forced somewhere, on a deadline, just because it’s convenient for you guys. I’ve put up with enough here. Derek, I know you don’t fully understand where I’m coming from. But Mike does. He’s been here. He can fill you in. This may not go exactly how I planned. But it’s definitely not going to go how you have planned.”

Even adjusting for the likelihood that it wasn’t put quite as smoothly as that in real time as it was in Stanton’s recollection of it to Reiter, it’s still pretty badass. Stanton had the power in that situation and he did not blink when the club threatened to call his bluff. In the end, he got what he wanted.

Beyond that, it’s a good profile of Stanton as he’s about to begin his Yankees career. Definitely worth your time.