The details of the Holliday deal

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In the excitement of the announcement of the Matt Holliday deal, the Randy Johnson retirement announcement and what was probably one of the least inspiring BCS bowl matchups in recent years, I neglected to break down the details of the Holliday contract, but they’re as follows:

  • Holliday will receive $17 million for each season from 2010-2016;
  • If he finishes in the top-10 in MVP
    balloting in 2016, a $17 million option vests for 2017. There is a $1 million buyout if the option does not vest;
  • Calling it an “option” however, may be a misnomer. There is no club discretion here: if he finishes 10th or better in the MVP voting, he gets it. I guess it could be a player option, but those of you who think that a 37 year-old Matt Holliday will be in a position to decline a check for $17 million probably need to get some professional help;
  • He
    has full no-trade protection.

All in all, it’s a guaranteed value of $120 million,  with a potential
value of $136 million. 

Personally, I would love to hear how this negotiation went.  If, say, the Cardinals had offered him six years and $90 million, what would Holliday have done?  What other team would have come in with that money?  Did they even try? We never really know how these sorts of things go, but unless we learn that some other team was really and truly bidding on Holliday — and to date we’ve had no credible reports of a competitor for his services — I’m forced to believe that the Cardinals bid against themselves. 

No matter the case, nice deal Boras. You got your guy the contract not many people thought he’d ever get. 

Major League Baseball reveals their special event uniforms for 2018


Major League Baseball will once again celebrate various holidays and special occasions with special uniforms this season. The special caps and unis for Memorial Day and the Fourth of July are largely in keeping with past practice. There’s a fairly notable change for Mother’s and Father’s Day, however, as what were once pink and blue accents are now full-blown pink and blue caps.

On Jackie Robinson Day — April 15 — players will, as always, be wearing number 42. New this year will be patches on the jerseys and caps. Like so:

Here is what the Mother’s Day caps will look like:

And for Dad:

Here’s Memorial Day. Like last year, the stars represent the five branches of the U.S. military. There will be camo jerseys, like you’ve seen before, to match:


The Blue Jays’ caps will feature four clusters for the four branches of the Canadian military:

Here’s the Fourth of July which will, again, be paired with stars and stripes-themed jerseys:

And check out the inside of the bill:


Fun fact: the Fourth of July is the day the signing of the Declaration of Independence was signed. It has little if anything to do with the Constitution, from which “We The People” is taken, which was ratified on June 21, 1788. But don’t stop MLB, they’re on a roll.

The Blue Jays cap, again, differs, with the logo being a gold maple leaf and the inside of the bill simply saying “Canada”:

As always, proceeds from the sale of this merch will go to the Jackie Robinson Foundation, Susan G. Komen, the Prostate Cancer Foundation and Stand Up To Cancer.

As as also long been the case, Major League Baseball will do nothing for Labor Day, much to my annual annoyance.