You have lots of choices at Target Field

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Gonna buy tickets to the Twins’ new ballpark? Make sure you give yourself plenty of time to plan:

The old Metrodome may have had questionable sightlines, but at least
the ticket pricing was simple. The new Target Field, meanwhile, has 120
single-game ticket variations–more than five times what was available
in the old park. The Twins aren’t alone–the New York Mets and Florida
Marlins both offer more than 100 choices.

The choices come from the facts that rather than be limited to the bleachers vs. the box seats, you can now choose to sit in the Gold Bond Medicated Powder Loge, the Planters Corn Nuts Reserved Boxes, or any other number of sponsored (or not) sub-sections in a given ballpark. And the prices of those seats can be one thing on a Wednesday night and something altogether different on Saturday. And of course, if the Yankees are in town you can expect to pay more than you would if the Royals are visiting.  With X number of potential seats times Y number of days of the week times Z number of opponents, and I’m not at all surprised that there are 120 different variations.

But it makes a lot of sense.  Some tickets are hotter than others. The way the prices and the options vary on the secondary market reflect this. Sure, it may be potentially-aggravating to try and find the cheapest possible seats, but as long as teams aren’t being deceptive in their pricing practices, I have no problem with them creating dozens if not scores of pricing tiers based on how great or how little demand there is for given seat at a given game.  To do otherwise would be to throw money away.

But yes, it does seem kind of silly at first blush. Indeed, when I read the article I was instantly I’m reminded of this old gem.

Miguel Sano suspended one game for altercation with Tigers

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Twins third baseman Miguel Sano has been suspended one game for his role in Saturday’s altercation with the Tigers, Mike Berardino of the St. Paul Pioneer Press reports. Sano will appeal his suspension, so he’ll be eligible to play until that is resolved.

On Saturday, Tigers outfielder JaCoby Jones was hit in the face by Twins pitcher Justin Haley. The Tigers’ Matt Boyd threw behind Sano when he came to the plate in the fifth inning, seemingly exacting revenge. Sano took exception, catcher James McCann pushed his glove into Sano’s face, and the benches emptied. Both Boyd and Sano were ejected from the game.

Sano has hit well in the early going, batting .241/.413/.569 with four home runs and 14 RBI with an MLB-best 17 walks in 75 plate appearances. Losing Sano for only one game won’t be the biggest deal for the Twins. Eduardo Escobar would get the start at third base to fill in for Sano if he loses his appeal.

Boyd was fined an undisclosed amount and not suspended, per MLB.com’s Jason Beck.

Matt Barnes suspended four games for throwing at Manny Machado

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ESPN’s Buster Olney reports that Red Sox reliever Matt Barnes has been suspended four games and fined an undisclosed amount for throwing at Orioles third baseman Manny Machado on Sunday. Barnes was exacting revenge for Machado’s slide which injured second baseman Dustin Pedroia on Friday, and was ejected immediately after throwing the pitch at Machado.

Barnes is appealing his suspension, so he will be able to participate in games until the issue is resolved. The 26-year-old right-hander has a 3.60 ERA and an 11/6 K/BB ratio in 10 innings so far this season.

The suspension is rather light considering Barnes’ intent. Barnes missed, thankfully, as he hit Machado’s bat rather than his helmet. Had he hit his intended target, though, baseball might’ve been out one superstar third baseman. Jeff Passan of Yahoo Sports wrote today that Major League Baseball needs to beef up its punishment for players attempting to injure other players. And he’s totally right about that. The punishment is neither enough to deter players from attempting to injure their peers, nor is it enough for teams to deter their own players from doing so.