Hall of Fame 2010: Jack Morris

4 Comments

jack morris.jpgNow that the “most feared hitter” of the late-70s is in the Hall of Fame, the anti-stats crowd has found a new champion, moving right from Jim Rice to Jack Morris.

Morris first appeared on the ballot in 2000 and received 22.2 percent of the vote. After a slight dip in 2001, he’s climbed steadily since, peaking at 44.0 percent last year. The only holdovers to receive a higher percentage of the vote were Andre Dawson (67.0), Bert Blyleven (62.7) and Lee Smith (44.5).

The case for Morris rests largely on two facts: he was the game’s leading winner in the 1980s, picking up 162 victories, and he pitched one of the greatest games of all-time, throwing a 10-inning shutout in Game 7 of the 1991 World Series to propel the Twins past the Braves.

And that’s mostly it. Morris did win 254 games in all, good for 42nd place all-time. He won 20 games three times and led the AL in victories twice, though the first time was in the strike-shortened 1981 season. He led the AL in innings once, in strikeouts once, in complete games once and in shutouts once. Also, he was a fine postseason pitcher apart from the game against the Braves, going 7-4 with a 3.80 ERA in 13 starts overall.

The case against him is obvious. He ended his career with a 3.90 ERA, which would be the highest ever for a Hall of Fame pitcher. His never finished higher than fifth in the AL in ERA. Some will argue that he pitched to the score and had higher ERAs as a result, but there’s no evidence that the phenomenon ever existed.
His results in the Cy Young voting is also a strong point against him. Some have argued that the fact that he received votes in seven different seasons actually adds to his case, but that hardly computes.

Morris spent 18 seasons pitching in a 14-team American League. During that time, there were 504 Cy Young ballots cast. 504 chances for someone to consider Morris the best pitcher in the league in any given year. Morris claimed exactly five of those votes: two in 1983 and three in 1991.

Over the course of his career, Morris received 0.73 Cy Young shares. Cy Young shares are the cumulative total of one’s percentage shares, so a unanimous Cy Young award winner would get 1.00 points, while the second-place finisher in any given year could get around 0.50 points. By that method, Morris ranks 69th during the Cy Young era (1956-present). No one among the post-1970 pitchers around him on that list will ever be thought of as Hall of Famers: John Denny, Mike Cuellar, LaMarr Hoyt, Pat Hentgen, Barry Zito, Bob Welch, Steve Stone, Dontrelle Willis, Mike Hampton, Pete Vukovich and Ramon Martinez.

The way I see it, if Morris had been born five years earlier or five years later, he would have fallen off the ballot by now. As is, he came into the league during a period which failed to produce any long-term stud starters, and that his production fit so neatly into a decade made for some fun stats. But in the end, he’s not one of the 50 or so greatest pitchers in history and adding him to the Hall of Fame would lower the bar, just as did the vote for Rice did a year ago.

This is Morris’ 11th of 15 years on the ballot, so realistically, he needs to take a big step forward right now if he’s going to have a chance of being elected by the writers. Besides the sure-to-be overlooked Kevin Brown, there are no worthy pitchers set to debut on the ballot until 2013, giving Morris a window to sneak in. If he jumps from 44 percent to 60 or so this year, then it’d be no surprise to see him standing at the podium come 2012.

Astros push ALCS to Game 7 with 7-1 stunner against Yankees

Getty Images
6 Comments

There’s just something about playing in your home ballpark. The Astros decimated the Yankees at Minute Maid Park on Friday, riding seven scoreless innings from Justin Verlander and a pair of big runs from Jose Altuve to win 7-1 and force a Game 7 in the American League Championship Series.

Through the first four innings, however, the teams looked equally matched. Luis Severino no-hit the Astros through 3 2/3 innings, losing his bid on Carlos Correa‘s line drive single in the fourth. The Astros returned in the fifth to do some real damage, drawing two walks and plating the first run of the night with Brian McCann‘s ground-rule double off of the right field wall. Things didn’t get any easier for Severino. Jose Altuve lined a two-RBI base hit into left field, upping Houston’s advantage to three runs.

Verlander, meanwhile, muted the Yankees’ offense with seven innings of five-hit, eight-strikeout ball. While he didn’t come close to matching his complete game effort in Game 2, he was still plenty dominant against a struggling New York lineup. No player reached past first base until the sixth inning, when a pair of base hits from Chase Headley and Didi Gregorius gave the Yankees their first runner in scoring position. That didn’t last long, though, as Gary Sanchez grounded out on a 3-0 slider to end the inning.

In the seventh, Houston’s ace got into another spot of trouble. He walked Greg Bird on six pitches to start the inning, then plunked Starlin Castro on the wrist. Aaron Hicks struck out, in part thanks to a questionable call by home plate umpire Jim Reynolds, but it was Todd Frazier who presented the biggest threat after returning an 0-1 fastball for a 403-foot fly out to left field. Luckily for Verlander, George Springer was there to bail him out with a leaping catch at the wall.

The Yankees kept things exciting in the eighth, too. Aaron Judge ripped his third postseason home run off of Brad Peacock, taking a 425-footer out to the train in left field to spoil the Astros’ shutout. That was the only real break the Yankees got, however, as Altuve, Alex Bregman and Evan Gattis returned in the bottom of the inning to tack on another four runs, including Altuve’s solo shot off of David Robertson:

Ken Giles handled the ninth, expending 23 pitches and giving up a base hit and a walk before retiring Frazier and Headley to end the game. Thanks to Houston’s winning efforts, the two teams will compete in their first seven-game Championship Series since 2004 — and this time, at least one of them is guaranteed to come away with a win.

Game 7 of the ALCS is set for Saturday at 8:00 PM ET. Houston right-hander Charlie Morton (14-7, 3.62 ERA) is scheduled to face southpaw CC Sabathia (14-5, 3.69 ERA).