Citi Field and the mob

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I’d say “only in New York,” but I spent a fair amount of time in my
legal practice doing construction law, and I learned that this kind of thing happens in
lots of places
:

The Mets shelled out $51.6 million in taxpayer money to contractors
shunned by the city for their ties to the Mafia, labor corruption or
bribery, The Post has learned. At least seven contractors the
city avoids were hired by the team to build Citi Field between 2006 and
2009, according to government records.

The tainted companies were paid from a $91 million pot the city Economic Development Corp. gave to the Mets.

It’s probably worth noting that a “tainted” company doesn’t mean a mobbed-up company any more than a company on some city-approved list is legitimate. There are tons of mob-connected or at the very least shady construction outfits on municipal approved lists all over the country because they made the right political contributions.

Likewise, there are lots of legit companies that are on non-approved lists because they wouldn’t play ball with with the right people. With “right people” usually being defined as a nogoodnik crony who got appointed to some mid-level job in the public works department because his brother-in-law knows people who knows people or something.  Big city construction is ugly.

And besides: which is the bigger misuse of money: $51.6 million to the mafia, or $36 million to Oliver Perez?

Javier Baez, D.J. LeMahieu have disagreement about sign-stealing

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Fellow second basemen Javier Baez of the Cubs and D.J. LeMahieu of the Rockies got into a disagreement in the top of the third inning of Sunday’s game at Coors Field over sign-stealing.

LeMahieu reached on a fielder’s choice ground out, then advanced to second base on Charlie Blackmon‘s single. While Nolan Arenado and Trevor Story were batting, Baez was concerned that LeMahieu was relaying the Cubs’ signs to his teammates. Baez decided to stand in front of LeMahieu to block any information he might have been giving to Arenado and Story. LeMahieu got irritated and the two jawed at each other for a bit. Umpires Vic Carapazza and Greg Gibson had to intervene to tell Baez to knock it off.

There has always been a back-and-forth with alleged sign-stealing. As long as teams aren’t using technology to steal signs, it’s fair game for players to relay information to their teammates about the opposing team’s signs. Last year, MLB determined the Red Sox went against the rules and used technology — an Apple watch in this case — to steal signs from the Yankees. Other teams in the past have been accused of using binoculars from the bullpen to steal signs. In this particular case with Baez and LeMahieu, there was no foul play going on, just Baez trying to make the Rockies cede what he perceived to be their slight competitive advantage.

The Cubs went on to beat the Rockies 9-7 on Sunday.