Ryan Braun, Scott Feldman honored

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And you thought the awards season was over:

Professional baseball stars Ryan Braun and Scott Feldman received
off-season honors December 23, getting named the Most Valuable Jewish
Players of the Year by an organization dedicated to celebrating Jews in
the national pastime.

Jewish Major Leaguers, a
Newton, Mass., not-for-profit, selected Braun as its player of the year
and Feldman as its pitcher of the year. This is the second time the
organization has awarded the titles. (Players honored by Jewish Major
Leaguers must identify as Jewish and have a Jewish parent, or be
converts.)

I’m struggling to think of one reason why the organization doesn’t call their hitter of the year honor “The Hank Greenberg Award” and their pitcher of the year honor “The Sandy Koufax Award.”  They’d certainly get a lot more press if they did. Maybe there are some legal implications here. I wouldn’t know. The State of Ohio just sent me my letter officially designating me an “inactive” lawyer now that I’ve left my legal practice. Going forward, if I pretend to know anything about the law I’m probably violating some ethical rules or something.

Anyway, a hearty Mazel Tov to Messers. Braun and Feldman.

Umpire admits he blew the call that got Joe Maddon ejected last night

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Last night in the top of the eighth inning of the Dodgers-Cubs game, Curtis Granderson struck out. Or, at the very least, he should’ve. After the game, the umpire who said he didn’t admitted he screwed up.

While trying to squelch a Dodgers comeback, Wade Davis got Granderson into a 2-2 count. Davis threw his pitch, Granderson whiffed on it, it hit the dirt, and Willson Contreras applied the tag for the out. End of the inning, right? Wrong: Granderson argued to home plate umpire Jim Wolf that he made slight contact with the ball, Wolf, after conferring with the other umps agreed, and Granderson lived to see another pitch.

Before he’d see that pitch, Joe Maddon came out to argue the call and got so agitated about it all he was ejected for the second time in this series. He was right to argue:

It all ended up not mattering, of course, because Granderson struck out eventually anyway.

Normally such things end there, but after the game a reporter got to Wolf and Wolf did something umpires don’t often do: he admitted he blew the call:

It’s good that the bad call ended up not affecting anything. But the part of me who likes to stir up crap and watch chaos rule in baseball really kinda wishes that Granderson had hit a series-clinching homer right after that. At least as long as it didn’t result in Cubs fans burning Chicago to the ground.