Giants re-sign Uribe; DeRosa's position in flux

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My assumption was that Mark DeRosa would play third base for the Giants after signing a two-year, $12 million deal yesterday, but Andrew Baggarly of the San Jose Mercury News reports that the 35-year-old has not been promised a set spot and “doesn’t care where he plays, so long as he’s in the lineup every day.”
General manager Brian Sabean explained yesterday that he’s still looking to add another hitter after signing DeRosa, noting that the team has “some offers on the table” and “will flush out the offensive possibilities” within the week. One of those offers was to Juan Uribe, who has reportedly decided to re-sign with the Giants after starting 103 games last season evenly split between second base, shortstop, and third base.
If the Giants are bringing Uribe back to fill the same utility role DeRosa may still end up starting at third base, but if Uribe is the extent of Sabean’s “offensive possibilities” it’s possible that he’ll play primarily third base with DeRosa getting most of his action in the outfield. DeRosa, Pablo Sandoval, and to a lesser extent Uribe give the Giants the flexibility to basically pursue any free agent hitter they like regardless of position, because they can shift those three guys around to make room for the new guy just about anywhere.

Video: Troy Tulowitzki plays along with a photographer who thought he was a pitcher

Tom Szczerbowski/Getty Images
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Thursday marked photo day for the Blue Jays. There are always some oddities, usually when the players create fun for themselves. This time, the fun happened when a photographer mistook shortstop Troy Tulowitzki for a pitcher. Tulowitzki rolled with it and followed the photographer’s instructions to pose like a pitcher.

Hazel Mae has the hilarious video:

Hitters, of course, typically pose with a bat over their shoulder. Pitchers typically have their hand in their glove, sometimes leaning forward as if receiving the signs from their catcher.

Tulowitzki has exclusively played shortstop during his 12-year career in the majors, but perhaps one day he’ll step on the mound and be able to call himself a pitcher.