Why doesn't anyone ever overpay Bob Howry?

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Bob Howry is apparently one of the most underrated or at least unluckiest relievers in baseball, because for the second straight offseason he’s managed only a one-year deal for modest money while inferior relievers get multi-year pacts for several times as much.
Brandon Lyon got $15 million over three years from the Astros. Fernando Rodney got $11 million over two years from the Angels. LaTroy Hawkins got $7.5 million over two years from the Brewers. John Grabow got $7.5 million over two years from the Cubs. Yet over the weekend Howry inked a one-year, $3 million contract with the Diamondbacks after playing last season on a one-year, $2.75 million deal with the Giants.
During the past half-dozen seasons Howry has had an ERA above 3.39 once, and in the other five years posted marks of 2.47, 2.74, 3.17, 3.32, and 3.39. He’s also been very durable, making 79, 84, 78, 72, and 63 appearances in the past five seasons. Among all active relievers with at least 500 appearances Howry’s adjusted ERA+ of 125 ranks 10th, and in the past six seasons only Mariano Rivera, Joe Nathan, Francisco Rodriguez, Francisco Cordero, Scot Shields, Chad Qualls, and Scott Linebrink have logged as many innings with a better ERA+.
Howry is 36 years old, next season will be his 13th in the big leagues, and he’s had a below-average ERA twice, yet after signing a one-year deal with the Diamondbacks he’s earned around $22 million for his entire career. Not bad money, obviously, but Lyon was just handed $15 million for three years and Danys Baez just finished a three-year, $19 million deal. Sometimes it seems like general managers randomly decide which relievers to overpay, and for whatever reason that dart has never really landed on Howry.

Report: Athletics sign Trevor Cahill to one-year deal

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Free agent right-hander Trevor Cahill reportedly has a one-year deal in place with the Athletics, according to MLB.com’s Jane Lee. The exact terms have yet to be disclosed, and as the agreement is still pending a physical, it has not been formally announced by the club.

Cahill, 30, is coming off of a decent, albeit underwhelming year with the Padres and Royals. He kicked off the 2017 season with a 4-3 record in 11 starts for the Padres, then split his time between the rotation and bullpen after a midseason trade to the Royals. By the end of the year, the righty led the league with 16 wild pitches and had racked up a 4.93 ERA, 4.8 BB/9 and 9.3 SO/9 in 84 innings for the two teams.

The A’s found themselves in desperate need of rotation depth this week after Jharel Cotton announced he’d miss the 2018 season to undergo Tommy John surgery. Right now, the team is considering some combination of Andrew Triggs, Daniel Gossett, Daniel Mengden and Paul Blackburn for the back end of the rotation — a mix that seems unlikely to change in the last two weeks before Opening Day, as Lee points out that Cahill won’t be ready to shoulder a full workload by then. Instead, he’s expected to begin the year in the bullpen and work his way up to a starting role, where the A’s hope he’ll replicate the All-Star numbers he produced with them back in 2010.