Why doesn't anyone ever overpay Bob Howry?

Leave a comment

Bob Howry is apparently one of the most underrated or at least unluckiest relievers in baseball, because for the second straight offseason he’s managed only a one-year deal for modest money while inferior relievers get multi-year pacts for several times as much.
Brandon Lyon got $15 million over three years from the Astros. Fernando Rodney got $11 million over two years from the Angels. LaTroy Hawkins got $7.5 million over two years from the Brewers. John Grabow got $7.5 million over two years from the Cubs. Yet over the weekend Howry inked a one-year, $3 million contract with the Diamondbacks after playing last season on a one-year, $2.75 million deal with the Giants.
During the past half-dozen seasons Howry has had an ERA above 3.39 once, and in the other five years posted marks of 2.47, 2.74, 3.17, 3.32, and 3.39. He’s also been very durable, making 79, 84, 78, 72, and 63 appearances in the past five seasons. Among all active relievers with at least 500 appearances Howry’s adjusted ERA+ of 125 ranks 10th, and in the past six seasons only Mariano Rivera, Joe Nathan, Francisco Rodriguez, Francisco Cordero, Scot Shields, Chad Qualls, and Scott Linebrink have logged as many innings with a better ERA+.
Howry is 36 years old, next season will be his 13th in the big leagues, and he’s had a below-average ERA twice, yet after signing a one-year deal with the Diamondbacks he’s earned around $22 million for his entire career. Not bad money, obviously, but Lyon was just handed $15 million for three years and Danys Baez just finished a three-year, $19 million deal. Sometimes it seems like general managers randomly decide which relievers to overpay, and for whatever reason that dart has never really landed on Howry.

Steven Matz to undergo “imminent” elbow surgery

NEW YORK, NY - AUGUST 14:  Steven Matz #32 of the New York Mets pitches in the first inning against the San Diego Padres at Citi Field on August 14, 2016 in the Flushing neighborhood of the Queens borough of New York City.  (Photo by Jim McIsaac/Getty Images)
Jim McIsaac/Getty Images
Leave a comment

Mets GM Sandy Alderson addressed the media about the status of starter Steven Matz on Tuesday afternoon. Alderson said that Matz will undergo “imminent” elbow surgery to address a bone spur in the lefty’s elbow, Marc Carig of Newsday reports. That will end Matz’s season.

Matz was expected to return this past Friday, but was scratched due to shoulder soreness. According to Carig, the shoulder doesn’t appear to be a major issue.

Matz, 25, finishes the season with a 9-8 record, a 3.40 ERA, and a 129/31 K/BB ratio in 132 1/3 innings. It was a pretty good showing for his first full season in the majors.

The Mets enter Tuesday’s action a half-game up on the Giants for the first of two National League Wild Card slots. If the Mets can secure one of those slots and then advance to the NLDS, they will likely use a rotation that includes Noah Syndergaard, Bartolo Colon, Seth Lugo, and Robert Gsellman.

Dillon Gee was hospitalized with blood clots in his lungs and shoulder

KANSAS CITY, MO - AUGUST 5: Dillon Gee #53 of the Kansas City Royals throws in the first inning against the Toronto Blue Jays at Kauffman Stadium on August 5, 2016 in Kansas City, Missouri. (Photo by Ed Zurga/Getty Images)
Ed Zurga/Getty Images
Leave a comment

Rustin Dodd of The Kansas City Star reports that Royals pitcher Dillon Gee has been shut down for the year after being hospitalized in Detroit due to blood clots in his lungs and shoulder. Gee first began experiencing shortness of breath on Sunday after playing the Tigers, Dodd adds.

Blood clots are a serious thing, so here’s hoping that Gee recovers quickly and painlessly.

In 14 starts and 19 relief appearances for the Royals spanning 125 innings this season, Gee put up a 4.68 ERA and an 89/37 K/BB ratio.