The Dominican Jim Bunning

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And here I thought Raul Mondesi disappeared from the face of the Earth after putting in 155 atrocious plate appearances for the Braves in 2005:

When Raul Mondesi left baseball after 13 seasons as a major league
outfielder, he returned to his dusty, overcrowded and impoverished
hometown determined to make a difference.

And both of the
Dominican Republic’s main political parties were only too happy to
assist, with one helping him twice win election to the country’s
national Chamber of Deputies and another luring him away to run for
mayor of the country’s sixth-largest city.

He’s not alone. According to Baxter, Juan Encarnacion, Melido Perez and Jose Rijo all hold office in the Dominican Republic as well.

Sadly, it seems that Mondesi is something of an empty vessel politically, with those quoted in the article questioning his intellect and grasp of the issues and noting that he has never sponsored any substantive legislation. Basically, his political career is based almost purely on name recognition and fame as a local-born ballplayer.

Glad that doesn’t happen as often here. If it did, I’m pretty sure it would mean that Paul O’Neill or Pat Borders would be the mayor of my town, and I don’t like either of those dudes.

Aaron Judge was involved in a weird play in the fourth inning

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Yankees outfielder Aaron Judge found himself front-and-center in a weird play in the bottom of the fourth inning during Game 4 of the ALCS on Tuesday evening. Judge drew a walk to lead off the frame. After Didi Gregorius lined out, Gary Sanchez flied out to shallow right-center.

Judge must have thought the ball had a high probability of falling in for a hit, so he was past the second base bag around the time he realized his mistake. He retraced his steps, running back to first base. Reddick’s throw hopped a couple of times but first base umpire Jerry Meals called Judge out on the tag-up play.

Manager Joe Girardi requested a review and the call was overturned: Judge was safe. However, Astros manager A.J. Hinch wanted to challenge that Judge did not re-touch second base on his way back. Rather than issuing a formal challenge, the Astros had to appeal the play by having starter Lance McCullers throw to second base, at which point second base umpire Jim Reynolds would issue a ruling. McCullers was a bit hasty, though, and made his appeal throw before Greg Bird stepped into the batter’s box. Reynolds told McCullers that he had to wait. So, McCullers again made his appeal throw.

This time, Judge was running and he was simply tagged out at second base for the final out of the inning. No need for a review.

As Ken Rosenthal explained on the FS1 broadcast, the Yankees were trying to “beat the police.” They knew Judge would have been ruled out — replays clearly showed he never re-touched the base — so they had nothing to lose by sending Judge. If he was safe, the Astros would no longer be able to appeal the play. If he’s out, then it’s the same outcome they would have had anyway.