A decade of Pirates baseball: Oh the humanity!

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If you’re a Pittsburgh Pirates fan, you might want to avert your eyes. The rest of you may proceed to check out an amusing look at the best and worst moments of the Pirates’ decade, courtesy of Joe Starkey of the Tribune-Review.

You can probably take a guess at what the ratio of best/worst moments is. Needless to say, it ain’t pretty. Some highlights:

  • April 9, 2001: The opening of PNC Park, one of the best stadiums in the majors, should have been a great night. But the christening took place only hours after the death of Willie Stargell, and of course the Pirates lost, 9-2 to the Reds.
  • June 7, 2007: Pirates pass on Matt Wieters at No. 4 spot in draft, instead selecting relief pitcher Daniel Moskos. The team then shines a spotlight on its own stupidity in a press release that says “(Moskos) was ranked by Baseball America as the fifth-best pitcher available in the draft.”
  • July 10, 2003: Randall Simon arrested for clubbing a racing sausage at Miller Park and is fined $432.10 for disorderly conduct.
  • 2009: Pitcher Ian Snell requests and is granted demotion to minors, saying, “I think the team is better off without me.”

There are a lot more entertaining nuggets in there. Check it out.

Follow me on Twitter at @bharks.

Danny Farquhar in critical condition after suffering ruptured aneurysm

Danny Farquhar
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Awful news for the White Sox and reliever Danny Farquhar: the right-hander remains hospitalized with a brain hemorrhage, per a team announcement on Saturday. He’s in stable but critical condition after sustaining a “ruptured aneurysm [that] caused the brain bleed” on Friday.

Farquhar, 31, passed out in the dugout during the sixth inning of Friday’s game against the Astros. He regained consciousness shortly after the incident and was taken to RUSH University Medical Center, where he’s expected to continue treatment with Dr. Demetrius Lopez in the neurological ICU unit.

“It takes your breath away a little bit,” club manager Rick Renteria said following the game. “One of your guys is down there and you have no idea what’s going on. […] When one of your teammates or anybody you know has an episode, even if it’s not a teammate, something is going on, you realize everything else you keep in perspective. Everything has its place. It’s one of our guys, so we are glad he was conscious when he left here.”