Who will the Yankees get to play left field?

Leave a comment

On the surface trading Melky Cabrera for Javier Vazquez clears the way for Johnny Damon to re-sign with the Yankees, but Joel Sherman of the New York Post reports that they still view him as “too expensive” after last week’s back-and-forth with agent Scott Boras. Sherman also notes that parting with Cabrera probably doesn’t make the Yankees any more likely to end up with Jason Bay or Matt Holliday.
So if Damon, Bay, and Holliday still aren’t likely options, who might the Yankees be targeting to play left field? Mark Feinsand of the New York Daily News names Mark DeRosa as “the most likely candidate,” noting that he could start in left field while also providing some infield depth behind Alex Rodriguez at third base. According to Feinsand the Yankees “have roughly $5-6 million to spend on left field.”
DeRosa was initially said to be seeking a three-year deal for quite a bit more than that to begin the offseason, but recently there have been reports of his asking price coming down and the Yankees were actually linked to him several weeks ago despite having no obvious place for him to play at the time. DeRosa hit just .250/.319/.433 in 2009 while battling a wrist injury, but his .291/.368/.453 line from the previous three seasons would be solidly above average in left field.

Jack Morris and Alan Trammell make the Hall of Fame on the Modern Era ballot

Rick Stewart/Getty Images
6 Comments

The Modern Era ballot was revealed last month. The results have been announced on Sunday night. Jack Morris and Alan Trammell will be inducted into the Hall of Fame next summer.

Morris, now 62, pitched parts of 18 seasons in the majors, 14 of which were spent with the Tigers. He played on four championship teams: the 1984 Tigers, the 1991 Twins, and the 1992-93 Blue Jays. While his regular season stats weren’t terribly impressive beyond his 254 wins, Morris has always had a decent amount of Hall of Fame support due to his postseason performances. Morris shut the Braves out over 10 innings in Game 7 of the ’91 World Series. That being said, his postseason ERA of 3.80 isn’t far off his regular season ERA of 3.90. If you ask me, Morris doesn’t pass muster for the Hall of Fame. He now has the highest career ERA of any pitcher in the Hall.

Trammel, now 59, had been unjustly kept out of the Hall of Fame despite a terrific career. He hit .285/.352/.415 across parts of 20 seasons from 1977-96, all with the Tigers. He was regarded as a tremendous defender and made a memorable combination up the middle with Lou Whitaker, who also played with the Tigers from 1977-95. According to Baseball Reference, Trammell racked up 70.4 Wins Above Replacement during his career, which is slightly more than Hall of Famer Barry Larkin (70.2) and as much as Hall of Famer Ron Santo (70.4).

Steve Garvey, Tommy John, Don Mattingly, Dale Murphy, Dave Parker, Ted Simmons, Luis Tiant, and Marvin Miller were not elected to the Hall of Fame. Miller continuing to be shut out is a travesty. Craig has written at length here about Miller’s exclusion.