Blue Jays view Brett Wallace as a first baseman

Leave a comment

By trading prospect Brett Wallace just months after getting him from the Cardinals for Matt Holliday the A’s showed that they don’t think he’ll be able to stick at third base defensively and apparently his new team agrees.
Wallace was taken in the first round of the 2008 draft as a third baseman and has played the position in 165 of his 192 games in the minors, but Blue Jays general manager Alex Anthopoulos made it clear in an MLB.com chat with fans over the weekend that he’ll be shifted to first base full time in 2010:

We think Wallace is capable of playing third. But, we see him being an above average defensive first baseman. Our hope is to have as strong as a defensive club as we can and putting players in a position where they have a chance to impact the club in the best way defensively.

In other words, maybe Wallace could be passable at third base, but the Blue Jays aren’t interested in that as a best-case scenario and mostly just want his bat in the lineup without his glove hurting them. Wallace will likely begin the year at Triple-A after Toronto got him in a straight-up swap with Oakland for fellow prospect Michael Taylor, but that could change if the Blue Jays clear first base for him by trading Lyle Overbay.

Derek Jeter wants to get rid of the Marlins’ home run sculpture

Mike Ehrmann/Getty Images
7 Comments

Derek Jeter, part-owner of the Marlins, met with Miami-Dade County mayor Carlos Gimenez on Tuesday afternoon at Marlins Park, Douglas Hanks of the Miami Herald reports. They discussed potentially removing the home run sculpture from the ballpark, something that has been on Jeter’s to-do list since he took over.

Gimenez said of the sculpture, “I just don’t think they’re all that crazy about it. I’m not a fan. We’re looking at it. … We’ll see if anything can be done.”

According to Hanks, the sculpture is public property because it was purchased as part of the Art in Public Places program, which requires art to be installed for the public in county-owned buildings. Michael Spring, the cultural chief for Miami-Dade who was present with Jeter and Gimenez on Tuesday, had previously said that the sculpture was “not moveable” and was “permanently installed” because it was designed “specifically” for Marlins Park. On Tuesday, Spring said, “Anything is possible. But it is pretty complicated. And I wanted the mayor and the Marlins to understand how complicated it really was. We got a good look at it today, and they saw how big it was. There’s hydraulics, there’s plumbing, there’s electricity.”

With Jeter having traded Giancarlo Stanton, Marcell Ozuna, and Dee Gordon this offseason, the home run sculpture is arguably one of the last remaining interesting things about the Marlins in 2018. Naturally, he wants to get rid of it.