The Red Sox can't be happy with Mike Lowell right now

Leave a comment

During an appearance on Sirius XM’s MLB Home Plate on Sunday morning, Red Sox assistant general manager Ben Cherington addressed the right thumb condition that nixed a possible trade of Mike Lowell to the Rangers:



“Even at the end of the playoffs, in our exit physical, he barely made
mention of it,” Cherington said in the interview. “It’s just one of
those things as a player you get used to being a little dinged up at
the end of the season. I think that’s how he felt it. And then Mike, as
many players do, sort of took his customary break after the season, let
the body heal and then when he went to pick up a bat again recently as
per his normal schedule he still felt a little bit in there and so
wanted to get it checked out.”




With surgery now scheduled for the
thumb, get used to hearing the Red Sox saying very complimentary things
about Lowell. It will be a constant theme between now and spring
training. You’ll hear about the wonderful progress he is making on his
rehab, or how the Red Sox are confident he’ll be even better than he
was last season. They’ll say whatever they can to boost his value
headed into spring training.

But while you hear these things, you have
to understand how frustrated the Red Sox are with Lowell for not having
the problem addressed sooner. Not only because of the nixed trade, but
what might have happened had the Red Sox stayed with the status quo.
Lowell likely wouldn’t have had the thumb examined during the offseason at
all had Texas not tentatively agreed to a trade. They have every reason
to be be furious with Lowell, even if they will say otherwise publicly.

UPDATE: FOXSports.com’s Ken Rosenthal predicts that “Mike Lowell will never play another game for the Red
Sox” regardless of whether or not the trade with the Rangers is truly dead. He writes that they’re unlikely to simply release Lowell, but “eventually will complete the kind of deal they
tried to make with the Rangers, paying most of Lowell’s salary to
make him disappear.”

Mets may move Asdrubal Cabrera to second base upon return from DL

Mike Zarrilli/Getty Images
Leave a comment

Newsday’s Marc Carig reports that the Mets may move Asdrubal Cabrera to second base when he returns from the disabled list. Cabrera has been on the disabled list since June 13 with a sprained left thumb, but he’s expected to be activated on Friday.

Cabrera, 31, last played second base in 2014 with the Nationals. He has played shortstop exclusively as a Met the last two seasons. Jose Reyes would continue to play shortstop if the Mets were to go through with the position change. Cabrera would displace T.J. Rivera, who has been playing second base in place of the injured Neil Walker.

In 196 plate appearances this season, Cabrera is hitting .244/.321/.392 with six home runs and 20 RBI. He has made 11 defensive errors, which is tied for the third-most among shortstops behind Tim Anderson (16) and Dansby Swanson (12).

Corey Knebel sets modern record for consecutive appearances with a strikeout

Stacy Revere/Getty Images
Leave a comment

Brewers closer Corey Knebel set a modern major league record for relievers to start a season, as Thursday’s appearance marked his 38th consecutive appearance with a strikeout. He set down the side in order in the ninth inning, striking Josh Bell out to start the frame.

Aroldis Chapman held the record previously, recording a strikeout in his first 37 appearances of the season in 2014 with the Reds.

Knebel, 25, has flown under the radar despite having an incredibly good season. He moved into the closer’s role in mid-May when Neftali Feliz, now a free agent, struggled. After Thursday’s appearance, Knebel is 12-for-15 in save chances with a 0.96 ERA and a 65/17 K/BB ratio in 37 2/3 innings.