The Mets go to five years on Bay, to meet with Boras on Holliday

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Jon Heyman reports that the Mets are getting aggressive on Jason Bay, upping their offer to five years, while also inquiring about Matt Holliday.

This is interesting in terms of leverage. On the one hand, it’s strange to see the Mets go an extra year on Bay a day after the Red Sox cut the cord on him and after the Yankees were reported to have no interest at all.  When your biggest competitors drop out of the bidding, you tend not to up your offer. The fact that the Mets did so smells like desperation to do something. Heyman suggests that there’s another mystery bidder lurking — maybe the Angels — but it hasn’t been reported anywhere, and in an age where the briefest of musings by a GM about a player is reported, it suggests that there’s no one else really on the scene yet.

At the same time, Heyman says that Omar is talking to Holliday. From the Mets perspective, it makes sense for them in that it signals to Bay that he’s not the only game in town. From Holliday’s perspective, it makes sense in that it’s a great way to use the Mets to pressure the Cardinals or someone else to prime the pot a bit more. I know, such a thing is unthinkable given that Scott Boras is Matt Holliday’s client — and that noted Boras mouthpiece Jon Heyman is reporting it — but maybe he can overcome his shyness and play Omar off of someone in the service of his client. And for what it’s worth, Buster Olney says that the Mets are merely “monitoring” the Holliday talks with St. Louis, but are “not actively involved.”  If you make me choose, I’m choosing Buster here.

Whatever is really going on, all of this comes against a backdrop of people saying that the Mets need to do something big and the Mets saying that they’re going to do something big.

So stay tuned: Omar is about to pay too much for someone.

Aaron Judge set a new postseason strikeout record

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For a few days, it looked like Aaron Judge was finally hitting his stride in the postseason. He was still striking out at a regular clip, piling more and more strikeouts atop the 16 he racked up in the Division Series, but he was mashing, too. He engineered a three-run homer during Game 3 of the Championship Series, followed by another blast and game-tying double in Game 4. His one-out double helped pad a five-run lead in Game 5, while his 425-footer off of Brad Peacock barely made a dent during a 7-1 loss in Game 6. And then Lance McCullers‘ curveball found and fooled him, as it did five of the 14 batters it met in Game 7:

The strikeout was Judge’s first of the evening and 27th since the start of the playoffs. No other major league batter has racked up that many strikeouts in a single postseason, though Alfonso Soriano’s 26-strikeout record in 2003 comes the closest. Within that record, Judge also collected three golden sombreros (four strikeouts in a single game), narrowly avoiding the dreaded platinum sombrero (five strikeouts in a single game).

It’s an unfortunate footnote to a spectacular year for the rookie outfielder, who decimated the competition with 52 home runs and 8.2 fWAR during the regular season and was a pivotal part of the Yankees’ playoff run. Thankfully, the image of McCullers’ curveball darting just under Judge’s bat won’t be the image that sticks with us for years to come. Instead, it’ll look something like this: