The Chuck Greenberg/Nolan Ryan group selected to buy the Rangers

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Well, they’re not buying yet. What they’ve won
is an exclusive negotiating window during which time they’ll hopefully
come to terms.  Most interesting aspect of this: Jim Crane was
reportedly the highest bidder, but he lost out. Dennis Gilbert was
reportedly a favored bidder due to his connections, but he lost
out too. Greenberg had Nolan Ryan in his camp, however, and apparently
Nolan can still bring the heat. Or at least the weight. Oh, and Tom Hicks is in the group too, which only goes to show that there’s no justice in the world. Dude bankrupted his previous ownership group and messed up a good EPL team too.  The fact that he got to pick an ownership group that included himself is, well, curious.

Bid politics aside, Greenberg has had a lot of sports ownership
experience. He was Mario Lemieux’s lawyer when Mario bought the
Pittsburgh Penguins. He’s the CEO of the Altoona Curve, and was
instrumental in getting them their (very nice) new stadium.  He also
owns minor league teams in State College, Pennsylvania and the Myrtle
Beach. They’re pretty well-run outfits as far as I can tell.

We lawyers are like a little sewing circle when we get together, and
the word on Greenberg in that circle is that he’s very aggressive and
very sure of himself, which makes him pretty par for the course as far
as baseball owners go.  The word on him also is that he, personally,
doesn’t have nearly the kind of money to buy a team himself, so it’s
likely that his ownership group is on the large side. This can work —
most people aren’t aware of this, but the original Steinbrenner/Yankees
ownership group had all kinds of minority owners, most of whom have
been bought out — but it can create problems as well.  We’ll see. Hopefully Hicks is relegated to silent partner status.

But at least things are moving forward. And Nolan Ryan is still on
board, which he wouldn’t have been with the other groups, and that
seems to matter to everyone involved.  The Rangers have a lot of talent
poised to bloom. Here’s hoping they’ll have an owner/gardener in place
that can ensure it does so.

Bob Costas wins the Ford C. Frick Award

NBC Sports
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LAKE BUENA VISTA, Fla. — Bob Costas has been selected as the 2018 recipient of the Ford C. Frick Award, presented annually for excellence in broadcasting by the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Costas will be recognized during the Hall of Fame Awards Presentation on Saturday, July 28, as part of Hall of Fame Weekend. He’s the 42nd winner of the Frick Award.

Costas — who, by way of obvious disclosure, has worked for NBC for the past 37 years — began broadcasting baseball in 1982, when he was paired first with Sal Bando and then with Tony Kubek for NBC’s Game of the Week telecasts. He soon established himself as the top national broadcaster in the game throughout the 1980s and into the 1990s. He worked play-by-play for NBC through 1993 and continued in that role for The Baseball Network, which was a short-lived joint venture between NBC and ABC for national broadcasting rights. During this time he was the pregame and postgame host for the All-Star Games and the World Series, with Vin Scully typically doing lead play-by-play.

Costas would move into doing play-by-play for these jewel events in the 1990s first for The Baseball Network and then, when The Baseball Network dissolved, for NBC, which had re-acquired baseball rights on its own. Costas called the World Series for NBC in 1997 and 1999, the 1998 and 2000 ALCS, the 1999 NLCS and the 2000 All-Star Game. After that Fox took over national broadcast rights which it still retains. Costas continues to appear on MLB Network, where he hosts a regular interview show titled MLB Network Studio 42 with Bob Costas and hosts other special programming. He likewise continues to work the booth for several games a year alongside color man Jim Katt, most recently in the 2017 postseason.

Those are the details, all of which are more than sufficient for a Frick Award winner’s resume. Costas, however, is far more deeply associated with baseball than the bare facts of his broadcasting assignments would suggest.

In many ways, Costas has served as baseball’s unofficial voice and conscience over the years. A lot of people write baseball books, but Costas’ 2000 book — Fair Ball: A Fan’s Case for Baseball — was a must-read given Costas’ stature and respect among the game’s most important figures, and it continues to be cited whenever people talk about potential changes to the game. Indeed, Costas himself was even suggested by some as a potential Commissioner of Baseball candidate around the time of its publication, based largely on its ideas.

In 1995 Costas delivered the eulogy at Mickey Mantle’s funeral. His words — especially the line describing Mantle as “a fragile hero to whom we had an emotional attachment so strong and lasting that it defied logic” — became instant history. He’d later be called on to deliver the eulogy at Stan Musial’s funeral as well. Given that Costas is a historian and fan of the game just as much as he is a broadcaster of it, he will no doubt continue to be called upon as an authority about the game and its place in 20th and 21st century society.

In more recent years Costas’ highest profile assignments have been hosting NBC’s Sunday Night Football coverage and anchoring its Olympic coverage. Given that neither NBC nor MLB Network have featured the League Championship Series or the World Series over the past decade and a half or so, it’s easy to forget — and understandable for younger people to not know — that Costas was, unquestionably, the national broadcast voice of Major League Baseball for two decades. For fans of a certain age — including this author’s age — Costas’ voice is synonymous with Major League Baseball.

The Frick Award is often awarded posthumously or after the broadcaster in question retires. It likewise often goes to people whose accomplishments are limited to their words in the broadcast booth. Costas, however, shows no signs of stopping and will likely continue to broadcast baseball games for several years. However long he continues to go, his impact and legacy in baseball is undeniable. He is, without question, a worthy recipient of the Frick Award.