Flores still the 'win-now' catcher for Nationals

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It’s a common occurrence for contenders to go for the sure thing, rather than trust the youngster. When it comes to surety versus ceiling, surety often prevails with teams that already expect to win 90 games.
But what about with the teams all set to lose 90 games? When the Nationals signed Ivan Rodriguez, the thought was that he’d play 70-80 games, which would hardly make him a backup. Rodriguez thinks he has a shot to be the starter:

“Well I’m ready to play every day. We discussed that. I’m a player that can still play every day and I will play every day and basically do my best for the club. I know it’s hard for me to play 162 games; that’s impossible for a catcher. But as long as I’m healthy, feeling great physically, I’ll be in the field playing.”

GM Mike Rizzo viewed it as more of a job-sharing arrangement, but he didn’t rule out the possibility of Rodriguez starting more than half of the time. As he told the Washington Post:

“He’s a 14-time all-star. He’s a very prideful guy. And he thinks his skills are at their finest, and he might be right, you never know. Like I said at the beginning, he’s going to be a significant contributor to the ballclub. Now if that means 70 or 80 games or 70, 80, 90, 100 games, those are questions that will be answered throughout the course of the season. The best problem I could have all season is, ‘Who of these two hot catchers are we going to play on an everyday basis?'”

Rizzo said all of that right after pointing out that incumbent catcher Jesus Flores is due to be ready for the start of spring training after shoulder surgery. Flores, who arrived in Washington as a Rule 5 pick from the Mets, is 25 now, and he’s spent almost three seasons in the majors. If the Nationals hadn’t sent him down for a month early in 2008, he’d be halfway to free agency. In 574 at-bats, he’s hit .260/.313/.406 with 16 homers and 99 RBI, a very impressive total for someone who has frequently hit seventh and eighth for bad teams. He came in at .301/.377/.505 in the 29 games before he got hurt last season.
To sit down a healthy Flores now would be a terrible idea. He still has a ways to go defensively, particularly when it comes to blocking pitches, but he is learning. He’s thrown out 31 percent of would-be basestealers, and for what little it’s worth, his catcher’s ERA has been better than the Nationals’ mark as a whole during his career.
Rodriguez’s .269/.297/.401 line over the last three years is actually slightly worse than Flores’, and he’s barely toped Flores by throwing out 33 percent of basestealers. With his vast experience, he surely does a lot of the little things better than Flores. However, when it comes to the big things, Flores is the better bet for 2010. If he stays healthy, he should be starting two out of every three games. He’s the future behind the plate, and he’s the one the Nationals’ young pitchers need to learn to work with, not the mercenary who could be out of the league as soon as his contract is up.

Jung Ho Kang’s DUI arrest was his third since 2009

PITTSBURGH, PA - JUNE 10:  Jung Ho Kang #27 of the Pittsburgh Pirates fields a ground ball in the second inning during the game against the St. Louis Cardinals at PNC Park on June 10, 2016 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.  (Photo by Justin K. Aller/Getty Images)
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Last week Pirates infielder Jung Ho Kang was arrested in South Korea for driving under the influence of alcohol and leaving the scene of an accident. That’s bad, but it turns out that it’s nothing new. The Yonhapnews Agency reports that Kang has been arrested for DUI three times since 2009:

Gangnam Police Station in southern Seoul confirmed that it was Kang’s third DUI arrest, with the three strikes law resulting in the immediate revocation of his license. According to police, Kang had also been arrested for a DUI in August 2009 and May 2011. No personal injuries were reported in either case, though he’d caused property damage in the latter incident.

The report also notes that a companion of Kang initially claimed that he, and not Kang, was behind the wheel at the time of the accident which led to Kang’s arrest last week. It was later revealed by the car’s black box, however, that Kang was driving. So add in some obstruction of justice, whether it is charged or not, to the scene. Police are investigating that.

Between all of this and the fact that Kang is under investigation for an alleged sexual assault in Chicago this past season, a pretty ugly portrait of the Pirates’ infielder is beginning to reveal itself.

Under Armour to become MLB’s official uniform provider in 2020

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This is interesting. Majestic Athletic has been baseball’s official uniform provider for decades, with its relationship with Major League Baseball dating back to the early 80s when it started providing batting practice jerseys. But that’s going to end after three more season:

As CNBC’s Jessica Golden reports, this will be Under Armour’s first official uniform deal in major professional sports. UA does, however, sponsor a number of individual players, most notably Bryce Harper.

MLB has just released a statement about it:

Beginning in the 2020 MLB season, Under Armour will be the exclusive MLB provider of all on-field uniform components including jerseys featuring prominent Under Armour branding, baselayer, game-day outerwear, and year-round training apparel for all 30 MLB Clubs.  Fanatics, a global leader of licensed sports merchandise, will be granted broad consumer product licensing rights to manage the manufacturing and distribution of Under Armour and Fanatics fan gear, which include jerseys at retail, name & number products and Postseason apparel. Under Armour and Fanatics expect to offer an assortment of new fan gear apparel and accessories at retail, prior to the 2020 season.