Gearing up for Wednesday at the Winter Meetings

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Each night the bar and lobby scene at the Winter Meetings lasts a bit longer, which in turn means that the morning starts a bit later. It takes a bit longer for the press room to fill up and the tweets to start flying. The line at Starbucks is deeper and deeper.  I bet I could make a killing selling the aspirin I have in my bag at inflated prices . .  .

Yesterday was dominated by the Curtis Granderson deal and the Peter Gammons news. Less noticed — because of the late hour and the lower star-power wattage — was Ross Gload signing with the Phillies.  Otherwise the day involved a couple of formalities and a lot of rumor mongering.

I’d expect the rumor mongering to continue today, as there is increasing speculation that Roy Halladay and Jason Bay could find themselves in new uniforms before we all leave Indianapolis.  I’m a little dubious — the Halladay thing is gonna take time — but that won’t stop the chatter. Our job?  To cut through the chatter as best as possible, putting lie to the baloney and getting there firstest with the mostest in terms of analysis.

As I said yesterday: refresh often, my friends.  

Each owner will get at least $50 million in early 2018 from the sale of BAMTech

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Earlier this year Disney agreed to purchase the majority stake in BAMTech, the digital media company spun off from MLB Advanced Media. We know it as the source of the technology for MLB.tv and MLB.com, but it’s far more wide-ranging than that now. At present it powers streaming for MLB, HBO, NHL, WWE, and, eventually, will power Disney’s and ESPN’s upcoming streaming services.

The company was started by an investment from baseball’s 30 owners, so they’re getting a big payout as a result of the acquisition. Earlier this morning Jim Bowden dropped this regarding how much of that payout is in the offing in the short term:

That’s probably on the low end, actually. Some people I’ve spoken to who are familiar with the acquisition say the figure is more like $68 million in Q1 of 2018.

Good for the owners! It was a savvy, forward-thinking investment that, in the past, baseball owners might not have made. Bud Selig, Bob Bowman and others deserve credit for convincing the Jeff Lorias and Jerry Reinsdorfs of the world to think big and long term. It’s money out of the sky, raining down upon the owner of your baseball team for, basically, doing nothing.

Money which should be remembered when your buddy complains about a relief pitcher getting $6 million for only pitching 65 innings. Money which should be remembered when your team’s GM says that he has to cut back on payroll in the coming year.