Could Hideki Matsui land in Oakland? UPDATE: how about Chicago?

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Question: What did you think of Hideki Matsui’s World Series performance? Another question: Would you like to have a player like Hideki Matsui in your
lineup?

That’s a question my buddy from the Japanese press corp. is going to be asking Bob Geren soon based on this report from John Shea about Matsui maybe going to Oakland.  To be fair, Shea calls it a longshot, but my homie was asking NL teams with three set outfielders about it over the past few days, so he’s probably going to crazy based on even a report this thin.

For what it’s worth, Keith Law calls any Matsui-to-Oakland speculation rather silly, noting that they have plenty of DH types that cost a fraction of the dough Matsui would, and without the sorts of question marks that surround him.

So I guess what I’m saying is that Keith law had better watch his back.

UPDATE: From the Chicago Sun Times!

KW is about to talk and Japanese media is here looking for answers. It’s on.

That poor, poor bastard.  Assuming Kenny survives, he’ll have to jibe his interest in Matsui with Ozzie Guillen’s statements yesterday that, with all apologies to Jim Thome, he likes to be able to rotate everyday players through the DH slot rather than have a dedicated DH.

Video: Troy Tulowitzki plays along with a photographer who thought he was a pitcher

Tom Szczerbowski/Getty Images
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Thursday marked photo day for the Blue Jays. There are always some oddities, usually when the players create fun for themselves. This time, the fun happened when a photographer mistook shortstop Troy Tulowitzki for a pitcher. Tulowitzki rolled with it and followed the photographer’s instructions to pose like a pitcher.

Hazel Mae has the hilarious video:

Hitters, of course, typically pose with a bat over their shoulder. Pitchers typically have their hand in their glove, sometimes leaning forward as if receiving the signs from their catcher.

Tulowitzki has exclusively played shortstop during his 12-year career in the majors, but perhaps one day he’ll step on the mound and be able to call himself a pitcher.