Are the Mets in on anyone big?

Leave a comment

An hour or so ago Sports Illustrated’s Jon Heyman said that the Mets were talking to John Lackey, Matt Holliday and Jason Bay “with renewed hopes to sign 1 of big 3.”  This contrasts with the general
consensus here in Indy — especially among the New York writers —
that the Mets aren’t really players for any of those guys and that if they do anything this week it will be to sign Bengie Molina and eat a few nice catered meals. 

Could that have changed? And if so, what could have “renewed those hopes?”  A sudden change of budgetary heart on the part of the Wilpons? A sudden backtracking on the part of Lackey’s people regarding their desire for the five or six year deal that no one seems to want to give him?  The Red Sox dropping out of the Jason Bay derby? Here’s a theory of my own: if the Mets are suddenly thinking bigger, it’s because the Yankees have been going hog wild (relatively speaking) this week, and they don’t want to get blown the hell off the back pages of the tabloids.

Whatever the case, any renewed push for one of the big three on the Mets’ part strikes me as a reactive move as opposed to one that was planned out ahead of time, because until this afternoon, all signs pointed to a relatively quiet Winter Meetings for the New York Mets. 

Henderson Alvarez signs with Tigres de Quintana Roo

Getty Images

Free agent right-hander Henderson Alvarez signed a deal with the Tigres de Quintana Roo of the Mexican Baseball League earlier this week, FanRag Sports’ Jon Heyman reported Friday. The righty wasn’t necessarily too fringey a player to hack it in the big leagues, but there were no MLB takers in attendance during his showcase in Venezuela last month and he clearly felt it best to try his luck elsewhere.

The 27-year-old’s last major league gig came with the Phillies, for whom he delivered a 4.30 ERA, 6.8 BB/9 and 3.7 SO/9 over 14 2/3 innings in 2017. While he’s not too far removed from his first and only All-Star bid in 2014, he was besieged by shoulder issues in 2015 and 2016 and underwent season-ending surgeries as a result.

That added injury risk, coupled with the fact that he hasn’t pitched more than 22 innings in a single season since 2014, may have been too much for major league teams to take on this spring. Assuming he steers clear of further injuries, however, a return to the majors may not be entirely out of the question in years to come.