Are Angels avoiding Holliday because of Boras?

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Last month Angels owner Arte Moreno revealed that the team would not be pursuing Matt Holliday and this afternoon general manager Tony Reagins confirmed those plans, telling Tim Brown of Yahoo! Sports that their stance on Holliday remains “unchanged.”
On the other hand, Reagins made it equally clear that the Angels are definitely in the mix for for Jason Bay, saying: “He’s a guy we find appealing and we’ll see where it takes us.”
Aside from the Cardinals focusing strictly on re-signing Holliday, seemingly every other team linked to one of the two free agent left fielders has also been linked to the other. Which makes plenty of sense. If you have an outfield opening and want a big right-handed bat, Holliday and Bay are certainly similar targets.
Perhaps Moreno is sending a message to agent Scott Boras, who represents Holliday and reportedly upset the Angels with his handling of client Mark Teixeira last offseason. Do the Angels really have tons of interest in Bay and zero interest in Holliday, or do they just want to avoid having anything to do with Boras? If it’s the latter, they certainly wouldn’t be alone.

Umpire admits he blew the call that got Joe Maddon ejected last night

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Last night in the top of the eighth inning of the Dodgers-Cubs game, Curtis Granderson struck out. Or, at the very least, he should’ve. After the game, the umpire who said he didn’t admitted he screwed up.

While trying to squelch a Dodgers comeback, Wade Davis got Granderson into a 2-2 count. Davis threw his pitch, Granderson whiffed on it, it hit the dirt, and Willson Contreras applied the tag for the out. End of the inning, right? Wrong: Granderson argued to home plate umpire Jim Wolf that he made slight contact with the ball, Wolf, after conferring with the other umps agreed, and Granderson lived to see another pitch.

Before he’d see that pitch, Joe Maddon came out to argue the call and got so agitated about it all he was ejected for the second time in this series. He was right to argue:

It all ended up not mattering, of course, because Granderson struck out eventually anyway.

Normally such things end there, but after the game a reporter got to Wolf and Wolf did something umpires don’t often do: he admitted he blew the call:

It’s good that the bad call ended up not affecting anything. But the part of me who likes to stir up crap and watch chaos rule in baseball really kinda wishes that Granderson had hit a series-clinching homer right after that. At least as long as it didn’t result in Cubs fans burning Chicago to the ground.