Yankees develop conscience, will cut payroll

Leave a comment

From the I’ll-believe-it-when-I-see-it department comes ESPN.com’s Buster Olney’s latest tweet:
Yankees finished org. meetings — they’re cutting payroll. I’m not sure yet by how much, but during season, expectation was to $185 mill.
$185 million would be the team’s tiniest Opening Day payroll since 2004. The team did drop payroll slightly last year, going from $209 million to $202 million, but it’s really hard to imagine that the team would open 2010 under $200 million.
The club is currently on the hook for almost exactly $150 million to Alex Rodriguez, CC Sabathia, Derek Jeter, Mark Teixeira, A.J. Burnett, Mariano Rivera, Jorge Posada, Robinson Cano, Nick Swisher and Damaso Marte. That doesn’t count the $4 million due to Kei Igawa, who is no longer on the 40-man roster.
Chien-Ming Wang, Melky Cabrera, Chad Gaudin, Brian Bruney and Sergio Mitre are all arbitration eligible. Perhaps Wang will be non-tendered, but the other four figure to cost about $7 million total.
So, that’s 14 players at $157 million. Other spots will go to Joba Chamberlain, Phil Hughes, David Robertson, Brett Gardner, Alfredo Aceves and Phil Coke, all of whom make the minimum. Now we’re at 20 players and $160 million.
Still, that doesn’t count Andy Pettitte, Johnny Damon, Hideki Matsui or their replacements. If Hughes and/or Chamberlain are going to be rotation candidates, then a new setup man will be needed. The team will also want a couple of veteran reserves to fill the roles occupied by Eric Hinske and Jerry Hairston Jr. at season’s end. A backup catcher is another possibility, though Francisco Cervelli is a candidate for the job.
Could the Yankees really take care of those needs for $25 million? Pettitte, Damon and Matsui would cost at least $30 million to re-sign, and it’s hard to imagine the Bombers going a whole lot cheaper in any of those spots.
My guess is that the Yankees will be right around $200 million one more time. And they’d probably be doing the rest of the league a favor if they stayed there. While they might not have squeezed as much revenue out of their new ballpark as hoped last season, they still did remarkably well and they made a bunch of money as a result of their World Series victory. There’s every reason to believe the Yankees could squeeze both Matt Holliday and John Lackey into their budget if they really wanted to.

Dusty Baker expects Stephen Strasburg to make his next scheduled start

Norm Hall/Getty Images
Leave a comment

Nationals starter Stephen Strasburg lasted only two innings in Sunday’s start against the Diamondbacks. The right-hander reportedly had trouble getting loose and it showed: he yielded a hit and three walks to the 10 batters he faced. According to Jorge Castillo of the Washington Post, Strasburg had “some nerve impingement that has been alleviated.”

Manager Dusty Baker expects Strasburg to make his next scheduled start on Saturday at home against the Rockies, Chelsea Janes of the Washington Post reports. Strasburg was examined by doctors, who deemed him to be in good shape — enough to not warrant undergoing an MRI.

Through 20 starts, Strasburg owns a 3.25 ERA with a 141/37 K/BB ratio across 121 2/3 innings. Though the injury scare isn’t what the Nationals hoped for, he’s done well in the first year of his seven-year, $175 million contract extension.

John Lackey hit four White Sox batters today

David Banks/Getty Images
3 Comments

Cubs starter John Lackey didn’t have his best stuff on Tuesday afternoon at Wrigley Field against the White Sox. The right-hander hit four White Sox batters over the course of five innings. He yielded just two runs, though, on five hits and two walks with five strikeouts. He left with a 4-2 lead.

Lackey hit Jose Abreu with one out in the first inning, then hit Abreu again in the fifth. He then hit Matt Davidson and Yoan Moncada shortly thereafter. Chris Beck relieved Carlos Rodon for the White Sox in the bottom of the fifth and promptly hit Ian Happ with a fastball to lead off the frame. Home plate umpire Lance Barksdale issued warnings to both benches and the beanings stopped.

So, how often do pitchers hit four batters in a game? Not that often! The last to do it was the Reds’ Josh Smith on July 4, 2015 against the Brewers. Before that, it was the Nationals’ Livan Hernandez on July 20, 2005 against the Rockies. Lackey is only the ninth pitcher to hit four batters in a game since 2000 and the 26th since 1913. The only other Cubs pitcher to do it besides Lackey was Moe Drabowsky in 1957.