Jacque Jones will be looking for a job next week

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After attending my first winter meetings three years ago I concluded that there seemed to be an inverse relationship between how important a person is and how well they dress for the event.
For instance, Peter Gammons looked perfectly at home holding court in the hotel lobby while wearing an old t-shirt, gym shorts, and a pair of running shoes, whereas the venue was littered with college-aged guys who put on suits, slicked back their hair, and walked around clutching resumes in search of an MLB job.
I bring all this up because MLB.com’s Thomas Harding reports that Jacque Jones will be attending next week’s winter meetings in Indianapolis in search of a team willing to give him a comeback chance and … well, my suggestion is that he buy a new suit and maybe some new shoes too. Harding writes that “Jones believes he can still play,” but at this point he’s likely alone.
He’ll be 35 years old soon, was last seen hitting .147 in 2008, and spent last season with the independent league Newark Bears after getting released by the Reds in spring training. At his best Jones was a good defensive outfielder who was helpless against left-handed pitching and posted an OPS in the .750-.800 range with poor on-base skills and solid slugging. However, at 35 years old and with his last decent season in 2006 he’ll be lucky to secure a minor-league contract with an invite to spring training.

Troy Tulowitzki poses as a pitcher on photo day

Tom Szczerbowski/Getty Images
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Update: The photographer was apparently in on the action, according to Topps. Still pretty funny. (Hat tip: Mike Ashmore)

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Thursday marked photo day for the Blue Jays. There are always some oddities, usually when the players create fun for themselves. This time, the fun happened when a photographer mistook shortstop Troy Tulowitzki for a pitcher. Tulowitzki rolled with it and followed the photographer’s instructions to pose like a pitcher.

Hazel Mae has the hilarious video:

Hitters, of course, typically pose with a bat over their shoulder. Pitchers typically have their hand in their glove, sometimes leaning forward as if receiving the signs from their catcher.

Tulowitzki has exclusively played shortstop during his 12-year career in the majors, but perhaps one day he’ll step on the mound and be able to call himself a pitcher.