John Henry thinks Red Sox fans don't understand economics

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John Henry, regretting that the Red Sox are raising ticket prices again:

“I am concerned with how expensive it is for four people to attend a game these days . . . Unfortunately virtually all contracts in baseball go up each year for on-field and off-field members of the organization.”

As Baseball Prospectus’ Joe Sheehan so eloquently put it nearly eight years ago “The price of tickets is not set to recoup costs, but to maximize revenue.” Indeed, this is how the price of just about every item in the stream of commerce is set (the price of razor blades and printer ink is apparently set by the Russian mob, however). Supply and demand you know.

If you don’t believe it, ask yourself why it costs so much to go to a Notre Dame or Ohio State game. They don’t have any salary expenses to recoup. Or the NFL, NHL and NBA, where salary caps have kept overall costs basically constant and certainly predictable, yet ticket prices have spiraled in ways wholly unrelated to expenses.

A smart organization sets ticket prices at the absolutely highest level they can be set without negatively impacting demand. The Red Sox sold out their games at last year’s prices. They will likely sell out their games at 2010’s prices. Those prices will continue to be raised until the exact moment people decide they are not worth the price and cease to buy Red Sox tickets. John Henry’s suggestions to the contrary are exercises in public relations.

Joe Maddon: “I have a defensive foot fetish.”

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The Cubs’ defense — or lack thereof this year — has been a topic of conversation as it could help explain why the team hasn’t played at the elite level it played at last year.

Manager Joe Maddon tried to go into detail about that but ended up channeling his inner Rex Ryan. Via CSN Chicago’s Patrick Mooney.

Well then.

The Nationals have scored 62 runs during four Joe Ross starts

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If, in the future, Joe Ross ever complains about a lack of run support, point to his first four starts of the 2017 season.

Ross started on April 19 in Atlanta against the Braves, on April 25 in Colorado against the Rockies, on April 30 at home against the Mets, and on May 23 at home against the Mariners. In those games, the Nats’ offense scored 14, 15, 23, and 10 runs respectively for a total of 62 runs, or an average of 15.5 per start. Ross was the pitcher of record for seven, eight, 10, and 10 runs for a total of 35 runs (8.75 runs per start), which would still make him the major league leader in run support by that restrictive standard.

Among qualified starters — Ross did not qualify — entering Tuesday’s action, the Rockies’ Antonio Senzatela led the way according to ESPN, averaging 7.11 runs of support in nine starts. The Rockies scored double-digit runs in only three of those starts, oddly enough.

Per the Nationals, the 62 runs of support for Ross is a major league record in a pitcher’s first four starts of a season.