Schneider jumps from Mets to hometown Phillies

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Brian Schneider has been a starter for basically his entire career, but the 33-year-old catcher will now back up Carlos Ruiz after signing a two-year contract with the Phillies this afternoon.
While one Philadelphia newspaper suggests that Schneider passed up a chance to start for several other teams in order to join his hometown Phillies, that seems fairly unlikely. Instead, my guess is that the best he could do elsewhere was a promise that he’d compete for a starting job with a younger catcher and rather than do that for a lesser team he decided to join the back-to-back NL champs and the team he grew up rooting for.
After all, Ruiz has started 100, 92, and 100 games in the past three seasons, is coming off a career-best .255/.355/.425 performance in the regular season, and batted .341 in the playoffs, so the Phillies probably aren’t looking to reduce his role. Instead, expect the left-handed-hitting Schneider to draw 40-50 starts while primarily giving the right-handed-hitting Ruiz breaks against tougher right-handed pitchers. It should be an effective quasi-platoon.
Philadelphia definitely didn’t need a veteran backup like Schneider, but the Phillies are strong enough up and down the roster that tinkering at the margins while paying a premium for depth makes sense. Meanwhile, the Mets never had any intention of re-signing Schneider and interestingly are close to signing Chris Coste, who spent most of the past four seasons backing up Ruiz for the Phillies. Musical catchers. New York is also said to be in the mix for Henry Blanco, and still has Omar Santos and Josh Thole as in-house options.

Yankees to hire Josh Bard as their new bench coach

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Aaron Boone has no experience as a coach or a manager at any level. As such, some have speculated that he’d hire a more seasoned hand as his bench coach as he begins his first season as Yankees manager. Someone like, say, Eric Wedge, who was a candidate for the job Boone got and who once managed Boone in Cleveland.

Nope. According to MLB.com’s Mark Feinsand, he’s going with Josh Bard.

Bard, 39, was a teammate of Boone’s with the Indians in 2005. He’s not without coaching experience, having spent the last two seasons as the Dodgers’ bullpen coach, but he’s not that Gene Lamont/Don Zimmer-type we often see in the bench coach role.

Which is fine because different managers want different things from their bench coach. Some are strategy guys, helping with in-game decision making. Others are relationship guys who help managers understand all of the dynamics of the clubhouse while they’re worrying more about lineups and stuff. Others are trust guys, who can serve as the manager’s sounding board, among other things. Some are combinations of all of these things. As Feinsand notes in his story, Boone said at his introductory press conference that he’s looking for this:

“I want smart sitting next to me. I want confidence sitting next to me. I want a guy who can walk out into that room and as I talk about relationships I expect to have with my players, I expect that even to be more so with my coaching staff. Whether that is a guy with all kinds of experience or little experience. I am not concerned about that.”