MLB average salary increases… barely

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Although the flailing economy had a big impact on the non-elite free agents last winter, the average major league salary did increase a bit this year to $2.996 million, according to numbers from The Associated Press. That’s up 2.4 percent from a $2.93 million figure in 2008.
The increase was the tiniest since a 2.5 percent drop in 2004.
The Yankees had the highest average annual salary once again, coming in at $7.66 million. The Pirates ($790,000) and Padres ($959,000) were the only ones to come in at under $1 million.
The AP numbers are calculated based on the season as a whole, which is why the Pirates occupy the bottom spot. They had a significantly higher Opening Day payroll than either the Padres or Marlins. The Mets, who had the second-highest Opening Day payroll, dropped all of the way to ninth because of all of the inexpensive players they used in an injury-ruined campaign.
See also: AP list of average salaries per year

MLBPA agrees to extend deadline for new posting agreement between MLB, NPB

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Update (7:00 PM ET): The MLBPA announces that the deadline has been extended 24 hours while MLB and NPB continue to negotiate a new agreement for the posting system. The new deadline is 8 PM ET on Tuesday.

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Last Thursday, we learned that the MLBPA was challenging the Nippon Professional Baseball posting system, delaying Japanese superstar Shohei Ohtani’s move to Major League Baseball. The latest collective bargaining agreement removed a lot of the incentive for players to come to the U.S. by capping pay. Ohtani, for example, can only receive a signing bonus between $300,000 and $3.53 million while his team — the Nippon Ham Fighters — would receive $20 million for posting him.

Jon Morosi reports that the deadline for this issue to be resolved is 8 PM ET on Monday evening. He notes that key NPB officials have worked through the night in Japan to try to reach a resolution. It is possible that even if no agreement is reached, the deadline could be pushed further back.

Ohtani, 23, has become a heralded hitter and pitcher in Japan. At the plate over his five-year career, he has compiled a .286/.358/.500 triple-slash line with 48 home runs and 166 RBI in 1,170 plate appearances. On the mound, he has a 2.52 ERA with a 624/200 K/BB ratio across 543 innings.