Non-tender tango: Kelly Shoppach

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shoppach.jpgDecember 12th is the deadline for teams to decide whether to tender
contracts to unsigned players on their 40-man roster. With that in
mind, this is the first in a series regarding some of the most likely
non-tender candidates and where they may find new homes. Though this is
based on some logic, it’s mostly intended to be a fun exercise.

Kelly Shoppach – .214/.335/.399 with 12 home runs and 40 RBI in 271 at-bats (89 games) in 2009.

Why he’s a goner:

Shoppach, 29, made $1.95 million in 2009
and is in line for another raise in arbitration this winter. In
retrospect, the Indians might have been wise to cash in on his
impressive 2008 season (21 homers and an .865 OPS in 352 at-bats), as
they’ll be lucky to find a taker before December 12. Shoppach just
doesn’t fit into Cleveland’s plans anymore
with cheaper options like
Wyatt Toregas, Lou Marson (acquired in the Cliff Lee trade) and top
prospect Carlos Santana also in the pipeline.

With Victor Martinez catching a few games a week until he was
traded to Boston in July, Shoppach appeared in just 89 games in 2009.
He’s always carried the reputation as a hacker (a Mark Reynolds-like
37.8% career strikeout rate), leaving him at risk for a low batting
average. Predictably, his BABIP (batting average in balls in play)
plummeted from .359 in 2008 to .286 in 2009, resulting in a career-low
batting average of .214. Despite the down year, Shoppach’s walk rate
progressed for a second straight season. He has amassed a very
productive career OPS of .776 and a park-adjusted OPS+ of 105 over his
first 909 major league at-bats.

Here’s a quick comparison with Bengie Molina, arguably the most “prominent” catcher in free agency:

2007: .731 OPS in 497 at-bats (OPS+ 86)

2008: .767 OPS in 530 at-bats (OPS+ 98)

2009: .727 OPS in 491 at-bats (OPS+ 86)

And here’s Shoppach:

2007: .782 OPS in 161 at-bats (OPS+ 102)

2008: .865 OPS in 352 at-bats (OPS+ 128)

2009: .734 OPS in 271 at-bats (OPS+ 98)

this is an unfair comparison with Shoppach’s limited sample size, but
the 35-year-old Molina is poised to make several million dollars in
free agency while Shoppach, who is at least Molina’s equal defensively
and five years younger to boot, isn’t. Food for thought, anyway.

Possible fits:

Blue Jays: Though the Jays will offer Rod Barajas arbitration, general manager Alex Anthopoulos says the 34-year-old catcher will probably find a multi-year offer elsewhere.
Earlier this week we learned that the Jays
have interest in free agent
Yorvit Torrealba
. They were also, albeit briefly, connected in trade
talks to the Diamondbacks’ Chris Snyder. Prospect J.P Arencibia had a
tough season with Triple-A Las Vegas, so he may need some extra
seasoning in the minors.

Mets: Brian Schneider is a
free agent, leaving Omir Santos and young Josh Thole as rather
unsatisfactory in-house options at backstop. Not surprisingly, the Mets
have been rumored to have interest in nearly every catcher available
via free agency and trade.

Royals: The Royals declined Miguel Olivo’s $3.3 million option
earlier this month and John Buck will likely join Shoppach among those
non-tendered in December. General manager Dayton Moore
wants to make
defense a priority behind the plate after the Royals led the majors in
passed balls and wild pitches in 2009
. Shoppach had six passed balls in
672 innings last season. Olivo led the majors with 10 in 846 innings.

Where he end should up:

I could see Shoppach landing in any
of the situations above, but I have a hard time believing the Mets will
commit the kind of money it will take to sign Molina, Barajas or Olivo
when they have so many other areas of need on their roster. This leaves
them looking at low-cost, high-upside options like Shoppach, creative
trades, such as swapping Luis Castillo for another bad contract
(Snyder), or, quite possibly, going with the status quo. Signing
Shoppach to a bargain contract off a subpar season would allow Thole to
continue to develop in the minors while thankfully taking the bulk of
the playing time away from Santos, who shouldn’t be starting on a team
that intends to compete for a playoff spot next season.

Jacob deGrom outduels Clayton Kershaw, Mets take 1-0 NLDS lead

Jacob de Grom
AP Photo/Kathy Willens

Jacob deGrom put together one of the best post-season starts in Mets history, outdueling three-time Cy Young Award winner Clayton Kershaw to pitch his team into a 1-0 NLDS lead. The right-hander fanned 13 over seven shutout innings, holding the Dodgers to five hits and a walk as the Mets won 3-1.

deGrom’s game score of 79 is the fifth-best by a Mets starter in the playoffs, behind Jon Matlack, Mike Hampton, Bobby Jones, and Tom Seaver, according to Baseball Reference. As Katie Sharp notes on Twitter, deGrom is one of three pitchers to hold the opposition scoreless on 13 or more strikeouts and one or fewer walks. The other two are Tim Lincecum and Mike Scott.

In the eighth inning, reliever Tyler Clippard allowed a one-out double to Howie Kendrick followed by an RBI single to Adrian Gonzalez as the Dodgers finally got on the board. Closer Jeurys Familia entered and recorded the final out of the eighth inning by inducing a weak line out from Justin Turner. In the ninth, Familia worked a 1-2-3 frame to wrap up the game.

Kershaw remains winless in the post-season since Game 1 of the 2013 NLDS, a span of seven starts. He gave up a solo home run to Daniel Murphy in the fourth inning, then walked the bases loaded in the seventh inning before departing with two outs. Reliever Pedro Baez entered and allowed two of his inherited runners to score when David Wright lined a single to center field. On the evening, Kershaw was on the hook for three runs on four hits and four walks with 11 strikeouts. Though he lost his command a bit towards the end of his start, the lefty pitched quite well and will be on the receiving end of some unnecessary criticism as a result of taking another post-season loss.

deGrom and Kershaw both struck out 11 batters, the first time that has happened in a major league post-season game.

Michael Cuddyer didn’t look too good out in left field for the Mets.

Game 2 of the NLDS will continue on Saturday at 9:00 PM EDT. Noah Syndergaard will start for the Mets opposite Zack Greinke of the Dodgers.

Clayton Kershaw, Jacob deGrom create MLB first with 11 strikeouts each in the playoffs

Jacob deGrom
AP Photo/Alex Brandon

For the first time in major league history, both pitchers in a playoff game have struck out at least 11 batters, per’s Paul Casella. Mets starter Jacob deGrom has pitched just a hair better than Dodgers starter Clayton Kershaw overall. deGrom has blanked the Dodgers over six frames on five hits and a walk. Kershaw made one mistake, resulting in a solo home run to Daniel Murphy in the fourth inning. He’s allowed four hits and four walks total in 6 2/3 innings.

The last time opposing starters each struck out 10 in a post-season game was back in 1944 in Game 5 of the World Series when Mort Cooper of the St. Louis Cardinals struck out 12 and Denny Galehouse of the St. Louis Browns struck out 10.

Michael Cuddyer not shining in left field early in NLDS Game 1

Michael Cuddyer
AP Photo/Kathy Kmonicek

Mets outfielder Michael Cuddyer has already made a pair of mistakes in left field and he’s only four innings into the first game of the best-of-five NLDS against the Dodgers.

Leading off the second inning, Justin Turner sent a well-struck liner to Cuddyer which was quite catchable, but the ball clanked off of the veteran’s glove. Turner was credited with a double. Mets starter Jacob deGrom was able to work around the misplay, striking out Andre Ethier, A.J. Ellis, and Clayton Kershaw to close out the frame.

With two outs in the third inning, Corey Seager sent a fly ball down the left field line. Cuddyer took an inefficient route and the ball bounced about a foot inside the foul line, then into the stands, giving Seager a ground-rule double. To add insult to injury, Cuddyer ended up tumbling over the fence. deGrom, again, worked around Cuddyer’s mistake, striking out Adrian Gonzalez to end the inning.

Because he bats right-handed, Cuddyer got the start in left field over the left-handed-hitting rookie Michael Conforto against Kershaw, a southpaw. Conforto mustered only a .481 OPS against lefties this season compared to Cuddyer’s .698. Despite the batting disparity, one wonders how short a leash manager Terry Collins has on Cuddyer given his defense.