Ross Ohlendorf: research intern

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There was a time when most ballplayers had regular joe jobs in the offseason. Some guys sold cars. Others sold real estate.  Richie Hebner dug graves for cryin’ out loud.  That practice is long gone now that even league minimum salaries are more than enough to live on through the winter, but somebody forgot to tell that to Pirates’ pitcher Ross Ohlendorf:

An e-mail requesting an internship arrived at the Agriculture
Department this summer with an impressive resume: Princeton University
degree in operations research and financial engineering, 3.8 college
GPA, 1520 SATs. Ross Ohlendorf didn’t mention his 95 mph sinking
fastball, but it probably wouldn’t have hurt his chances. Department
officials were impressed that the Pittsburgh Pirates pitcher wanted to
work for them in the offseason . . .

. . . Ohlendorf, who is 6 feet 4 inches tall and weighs 240 pounds, shares
a small office with another USDA employee. His work is mainly focused
on animal identification — the nationwide tracking system intended to
pinpoint an animal’s location after a disease is discovered.”I’ve
really enjoyed it,” he said. “In addition to learning a lot of things
and meeting a lot of neat people, I’ve gotten to do some cool events

Ohlendorf actually had a decent enough season for the Pirates this year, so he probably won’t need to think about getting a real job for a while. But maybe teammates Matt Capps and Brandon Moss should take note and start sharpening their resumes a little.

Joe Girardi is not a fan of Game 162 scheduling

Joe Girardi
Getty Images

The Yankees fell behind early to the Orioles on Sunday afternoon, a day after dropping both ends of Saturday’s doubleheader. Their game, as did every other game on Sunday with the exception of the Braves-Cardinals doubleheader, started at 3:05 or 3:10 EDT, a change Major League Baseball recently made to create fairness on the final day of the season.

Girardi is not a fan. Per the Associated Press:

It was cloudy at Camden Yards at 3:05 p.m., but late-afternoon games often make it difficult for batters to see pitches.

Girardi said, “Here’s the thing that bothers me: If it’s a sunny day you’re playing in shadows.”

He added, “If it’s the most important game of the year to get in, I don’t think that’s right.”

Understanding the idea is for every team to play at the same time, Girardi said, “Then play all night games.”

One wonders if MLB had scheduled Sunday’s slate of games for the night, if Girardi would have instead complained about batters losing fly balls in the stadium lights. Furthermore, both teams have to play in the same conditions.

Video: Ichiro Suzuki pitches an inning for the Marlins

Ichiro Suzuki
AP Photo

Marlins outfielder Ichiro Suzuki was given an opportunity to play a new position in Sunday’s series finale against the Phillies. After the Phillies rallied to take a 6-2 lead in the seventh, the Marlins let Suzuki take the hill in the eighth. And, in news that surprises no one, he was impressive.

Though Suzuki gave up a run on two hits, he flashed a fastball that hit the mid-80’s and a breaking ball with some bite.

Suzuki, who turns 42 years old later this month, is 65 hits of 3,000 in his major league career. The Marlins are interested in bringing him back in 2016.