Giving Thanks

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MLB.com lists some of the many things we baseball fans have to be thankful for this fine morning:

Thanks to Nationals right-hander Craig Stammen, Orioles right fielder
Nick Markakis, Marlins club representatives and anyone else who was
spotted this past week delivering turkeys and meals to families in
need. There is only one word.

Thanks to Tigers outfielder Magglio Ordonez for allowing your famously
flowing locks to be cut and auctioned for charity. The proceeds
provided about $6,000 to Imerman Angels, a Chicago-based nonprofit
group that connects those battling cancer with those who have survived
it to provide inspiration.

Thanks to 2009 Roberto Clemente Award winner Derek Jeter of the Yankees and your Turn 2 Foundation for pointing so many kids in the right direction. While we’re at it, thanks for taking us along for that joy ride resulting in hit No. 2,722 to pass Lou Gehrig for No. 1 on the Yankees’ all-time list.

Thanks to everyone involved with the youth initiative that was the focus of Game 4 of the World Series. Reviving Baseball in Inner Cities presented by KPMG, along with the Boys & Girls Clubs of America, continued to overcome inherent challenges in making baseball available for all kids.

There were many club-level Komen events as well, like the one on Sept. 5 at Oakland, where the A’s raised $75,690 on Breast Cancer Awareness Day. Proceeds benefited the American Cancer Society, Northern California Cancer Center and Komen. Those events are so common and worth highlighting as an example here.

Thanks for everyone who helped with the Prostate Cancer Foundation efforts on the annual Father’s Day events at the ballparks. And thanks to the late Michael Goldsmith, whose plea as a fan with Lou Gehrig’s disease inspired the initiative that led to 4♦ALS Awareness.

There are many other things listed, both charitable and merely baseball-related.  It’s worth a gander to see just how much those in and around baseball do for the community and to simply make our little lives a bit more enjoyable between April and November.

The CTB family would like to give thanks too.  When we launched this blog back in April we would have been happy if our mothers and girlfriends* read it.  It’s been nice to see the community grow these past few months and stay with us as the baseball season has turned into the hot stove season.

And it is a community: more than just we knuckleheads opining on stuff, CTB has become a place for baseball conversation, and you can’t have a conversation unless someone is talking back to you.  Sure, sometimes you yell back at us, but that’s OK. Keeps us on our toes.  The point is, we thank you for coming by each day, and we look forward to continuing to bring you all the baseball news (and rumors and gossip and vendettas and occasionally innuendo) that’s fit to print.

Thanks,

The CTB Team

*These girls are hypothetical; we’re bloggers after all.

Cubs sign Brett Anderson to a $3.5 million deal

Brett Anderson
AP Photo/J Pat Carter
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Ken Rosenthal of FOX Sports reports that the Cubs have signed pitcher Brett Anderson to a contract, pending a physical. Anderson, apparently, impressed the Cubs during a bullpen session held in Arizona recently. According to Jeff Passan of Yahoo Sports, the deal is for $3.5 million, but incentives can bring the total value up to $10 million.

Anderson, 28, has only made a total of 53 starts and 12 relief appearances over the past five seasons due to a litany of injuries. This past season, he made just three starts and one relief appearance, yielding 15 runs on 25 hits and four walks with five strikeouts in 11 1/3 innings. The lefty dealt with back, wrist, and blister issues throughout the year.

When he’s healthy, Anderson is a solid arm to have at the back of a starting rotation or in the bullpen. The defending world champion Cubs aren’t risking much in bringing him on board.

Yordano Ventura’s remaining contract hinges on the results of his toxicology report

DETROIT, MI - SEPTEMBER 24: Yordano Ventura #30 of the Kansas City Royals pitches against the Detroit Tigers during the first inning at Comerica Park on September 24, 2016 in Detroit, Michigan. (Photo by Duane Burleson/Getty Images)
Duane Burleson/Getty Images
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Ken Rosenthal of FOX Sports provides an interesting window into how teams handle a player’s contract after he has died in an accident. It was reported on Sunday that Royals pitcher Yordano Ventura died in a car accident in the Dominican Republic. He had three guaranteed years at a combined $19.25 million as well as two $12 million club options with a $1 million buyout each for the 2020-21 seasons.

What happens to that money? Well, that depends on the results of a toxicology report, Rosenthal explains. If it is revealed that Ventura was driving under the influence, payment to his estate can be nullified. The Royals may still choose to pay his estate some money as a gesture of good will, but they would be under no obligation to do so. However, if Ventura’s death was accidental and not caused by his driving under the influence, then his contract remains fully guaranteed and the Royals would have to pay it towards his estate. The Royals would be reimbursed by insurance for an as yet unknown portion of that contract.

The results of the toxicology report won’t be known for another three weeks, according to Royals GM Dayton Moore. Dominican Republic authorities said that there was no alcohol found at the scene.

Ventura’s situation is different than that of Marlins pitcher Jose Fernandez, who died in a boating accident this past September. Fernandez was not under contract beyond 2016. He was also legally drunk and cocaine was found in his system after the accident. Still, it is unclear whether or not Fernandez was driving the boat. As a result, his estate will receive an accidental death payment of $1.05 million as well as $450,000 through the players’ standard benefits package, Rosenthal points out.