The Angels could be the Tigers' ideal trade partner

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Rosenthal says that someone “with close knowledge of the Tigers’ organization” thinks that the Angels may be the best trade partner out there for Detroit, given that they have depth at the three positions the Tigers have the most need: catcher, shortstop, and minimum-salary pitching.

Setting aside the curiousness of the phrase “someone with close knowledge of the Tigers’ organization” — who is that? A writer? A front office guy? A croupier from the MotorCity Casino? — Rosenthal adds the Angels to the long list of teams who would be interested in Curtis Granderson. More so than in Edwin Jackson, despite the fact that he’d help fill a hole created by the presumed departure of John Lackey. It’s all about (a) control, in that Granderson is locked up longer; and (b) Boras, as in Jackson is represented by him, making it less likely that they’d be able to keep him around beyond 2011 when he hits the market.

I still remain unconvinced that the Tigers will trade Granderson, if for no other reason that that which makes him so desirable — that he’s a cheap, All-Star quality centerfielder — is the exact thing that makes him so valuable to a Tigers.

Umpire admits he blew the call that got Joe Maddon ejected last night

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Last night in the top of the eighth inning of the Dodgers-Cubs game, Curtis Granderson struck out. Or, at the very least, he should’ve. After the game, the umpire who said he didn’t admitted he screwed up.

While trying to squelch a Dodgers comeback, Wade Davis got Granderson into a 2-2 count. Davis threw his pitch, Granderson whiffed on it, it hit the dirt, and Willson Contreras applied the tag for the out. End of the inning, right? Wrong: Granderson argued to home plate umpire Jim Wolf that he made slight contact with the ball, Wolf, after conferring with the other umps agreed, and Granderson lived to see another pitch.

Before he’d see that pitch, Joe Maddon came out to argue the call and got so agitated about it all he was ejected for the second time in this series. He was right to argue:

It all ended up not mattering, of course, because Granderson struck out eventually anyway.

Normally such things end there, but after the game a reporter got to Wolf and Wolf did something umpires don’t often do: he admitted he blew the call:

It’s good that the bad call ended up not affecting anything. But the part of me who likes to stir up crap and watch chaos rule in baseball really kinda wishes that Granderson had hit a series-clinching homer right after that. At least as long as it didn’t result in Cubs fans burning Chicago to the ground.