If Mariners are done with Lopez, suitors should be plentiful

Leave a comment

jose lopez getty.jpgIt’s been suspected by some, but never phrased so strongly. Seattle Times writer Geoff Baker — our most trusted Mariners news source — wrote Tuesday that he “seriously doubts” second baseman Jose Lopez will still be a Mariner by the start of spring training.
No legitimate Lopez rumors have sprung up yet, with the little talk surrounding him more concentrated on whether he could become the Mariners’ full-time first baseman.
Lopez had the Triple Crown numbers of a first baseman last season, coming in at .272-25-96. He also smacked 42 doubles. However, it took him 613 at-bats to get there. With just 24 walks on the season, his OBP was a lousy .303. He scored just 69 runs despite batting third for much of the season.
Lopez has four full major league seasons in and has never walked more than 30 times in any of them.
On the other hand, Lopez is just now turning 26 (today, actually), and he truly was a force in Seattle’s lineup after a rough first two months. From May 29 on, he hit .295/.321/.526. The only second basemen to drive in more runs last season were Aaron Hill and Brandon Phillips.
Lopez is also rather inexpensive. He’ll make a total of $7.75 million in his final two seasons before free agency.
So, why would the Mariners be at all anxious to move him? Part of it is the OBP. Mostly, though, it’s about defense. While UZR has rated Lopez a bit above average at second base over the course of the last four seasons, the Mariners clearly think he’s a liability there. It’s why they stuck him at first base over his objections while Russell Branyan was hurt, and it’s why they’re thinking about moving him now even though it’s doubtful that they’d be willing to turn second base over to Matt Tuiasosopo or Bill Hall. Maybe they’ll go to Dustin Ackley eventually, but he shouldn’t be ready until 2011 at the earliest.
I’m more on the Mariners’ side here: Lopez is pretty clearly below average. He’s strong on the double play, but he lacks range. If he worked on getting into better shape, then maybe he could stay there for another half dozen years or so. As is, he might be more useful somewhere else.
What surprises me is that the Mariners aren’t viewing third base as an option. They have a hole there with Adrian Beltre leaving, and Lopez clearly has the arm for the position. I think Lopez would become a fine third baseman in short order.
But it appears more likely that the Mariners are set on trading Lopez. The Dodgers, Cubs and Diamondbacks have the biggest needs at second base, and the Mets would like to make a change from Luis Castillo. I could definitely see Lopez hitting 30 homers in Wrigley Field next year and then moving to first or third in 2011 if Derrek Lee and/or Aramis Ramirez choose to depart.
The Mariners would likely ask for young pitching in return and they could also inquire about Hak-Ju Lee, a talented young shortstop buried behind Cubs’ No. 1 prospect Starlin Castro. Another option as a second or third piece in a deal would be Jake Fox, who would make a lot of sense as a right-handed option at DH and first base.
If Lopez is open to playing third base, the market for his services would further expand. There might even be some teams interested in using him as a corner outfielder. Young, inexpensive right-handed power doesn’t come along all that often.

DOJ settles antirust lawsuit against cable companies who don’t carry Dodgers games

Getty Images
1 Comment

Last November, the U.S. Department of Justice sued AT&T, accusing its subsidiary, DirecTV, of being the ringleader in a plot in which it conspired with Cox Communications, Charter Communications and AT&T cable (then a separate company), to refuse to carry SportsNet LA, the Dodger-owned TV channel in violation of antitrust laws.

Now that lawsuit is over. DOJ has settled with AT&T last night.

The bad news: no part of the settlement obligates DirecTV or any of the other alleged co-conspirators to carry Dodgers games or to even negotiate to that end. There is likewise no fine or truly substantive penalty. It’s basically a “do not do this again!” agreement with some antitrust training requirements for executives and some orders to monitor their communications about these things.

“We are pleased to have resolved this matter to the satisfaction of all parties,” and AT&T spokesman said yesterday, likely in the tone of a guy who is pretty happy to have had a major antitrust suit against him settled so quickly.

When the suit was filed, I anticipated a settlement, as most antitrust suits brought by the DOJ are settled. Such a settlement could’ve featured a cash penalty or, more significantly, a brokered agreement between the parties in question in lieu of a cash settlement that could’ve led to Dodgers games being carried on more channels. After all, more competition is the end game of the Antirust Division.

As it is, however, it’s hard to see this as anything other than a surrender by the DOJ and a victory for the those carriers who coordinated their efforts to not carry the Dodgers.

An open question, unanswered in anyone’s statements yesterday, is whether this settlement is 100% about the merits of the case — keeping in mind that the DOJ tends not file antitrust suits unless they think they can win, instead preferring to negotiate first — or whether it represents a new set of laxer priorities when it comes to antitrust enforcement from the Trump Administration and AG Jeff Sessions.

Video: Jake Arrieta hits a 465-foot home run off of Zack Greinke

Jamie Squire/Getty Images
5 Comments

Jake Arrieta‘s bat is in midseason form already. The Cubs’ ace swatted a solo home run to center field off of Zack Greinke in Thursday afternoon’s Grapefruit League exhibition game, his first homer of the spring.

The blast went 465 feet, according to MLB.com’s Daren Willman.

Arrieta has hit two home runs in each of the past two seasons. Madison Bumgarner (eight) and Noah Syndergaard (four) are the only other pitchers to match or exceed his output in that department.

Greinke, meanwhile, is hoping to bounce back after a miserable 2016 season. He finished with an uncharacteristic 4.37 ERA in 26 starts in his first year with the Diamondbacks.