Yankees still have Mitre in plans after declining option

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mitre getty.jpgSure, $1.25 million is barely a drop in the bucket for the Bombers, but why spend it if you don’t have to?
The Yankees on Tuesday declined Sergio Mitre’s $1.25 million option for 2010, but did so while retaining the 28-year-old’s rights for 2009. That’s because Mitre is short of the six years of service time he’d need for free agency.
Mitre is now eligible for arbitration, and it’s unlikely that he’ll be able to ask for more than $1 million after going 3-3 with a 6.79 ERA in nine starts and three relief appearances in his return from Tommy John surgery last season. The right-hander has a career ERA of 5.56 in 61 starts and 29 relief appearance.
If Mitre isn’t willing to accept a modest one-year deal, the Yankees could always non-tender him next month. But it’s more likely that they’ll keep him around and settle on a contract closer to arbitration season. He should enter spring training no higher than sixth or seventh on the rotation depth chart, so he’ll have a fight on his hands if he’s going to make the team as a middle reliever.

Yankees sign Adam Lind to a minor league deal. Again.

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The Yankees signed Adam Lind to a minor league deal this past offseason. Then they released him during spring training. Now they have signed him to another minor league deal. He’ll report to extended spring training where he’ll now try not to get extended released.

Lind is a platoon guy with little defensive value, but he hit .303/.362/.513 with 14 home runs and 59 RBI in 301 plate appearances for the Nationals last season, serving as a pinch-hitter and backup first baseman and outfielder. The injury to Greg Bird and the impending suspension of Tyler Austin — he’s currently on appeal — will likely give him at least some opportunity to show that he’s still a big leaguer.

Which, yeah, he probably still is. Or at least would be if teams didn’t have 13 and 14-man pitching staffs and actually had room for a couple of bench position players. Such is not the current game of baseball, however.