Does Crawford want out of Tampa?

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Thumbnail image for crawford.jpgAccording to a report from Mike Silva’s New York Baseball Digest, Carl Crawford is “livid” over management’s decision to pick up his $10 million option for next season and now wants out of Tampa.



Says a source with the knowledge of the situation:


“He wants out of Tampa bad. He had a handshake
agreement with management that they would renegotiate the contract
instead of picking up the option and they went ahead and did it anyway.
He’s pissed beyond belief.”



Crawford, 28, signed a four-year,
$15.25 million extension with the Rays in 2005, with club options for two additional years. He is expected to be among the most coveted free agents
next winter.




While not impossible, it would be irresponsible to give this rumor too much validity. Silva deserves credit for getting the Wally Backman-Brooklyn Cyclones story right,
but he also found an MLB executive who said
the following about “Moneyball” and
advanced metrics
:


Among other sewage that has oozed to the surface is the erroneous
belief that statistics are the end-all in baseball today, a myth
perpetrated by the garbage called “MoneyBall.” Moneyball geniuses have
flopped like DePodesta, Ricciardi, and even the infamous Billy Beane
whose exploits have all lacked a World Series trophy. It is all a tool
to be used by the uninitiated. I’ll take a good scout and player
development people anytime; the statistics are very secondary. How do
you account a .220 hitter for being the hero of the World Series or a
guy who hits three home runs a year wins the pennant clincher with a
home run? Pitchers often get the best of hitters in the playoffs. There
are a million examples of things going against the logic of statistical
analysis.


Let’s just say his “sources” might not know what they’re talking about.


Kenley Jansen’s consecutive saves streak ends at 34

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Dodgers closer Kenley Jansen gave up three runs in the top of the ninth inning during Sunday’s game against the Braves, blowing his first save since August 26 last season. He had converted 34 consecutive saves.

Jansen yielded back-to-back singles to lead off the ninth inning, staked to a 4-1 lead. After getting two outs, Matt Adams hit a three-run home run down the right field line to knot the game at four apiece.

After Sunday’s lackluster performance, Jansen is now 24-for-25 in save chances this season with a 1.49 ERA and a 62/2 K/BB ratio in 42 1/3 innings.

Zach Britton sets American League record with 55th consecutive save

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Orioles closer Zach Britton finished Sunday’s 9-7 victory over the Astros with a scoreless ninth inning, earning his sixth save of the season. He has now earned the save in 55 consecutive opportunities dating back to September 2015, setting a new American League record. Tom Gordon previously held the record with 54 consecutive saves. Eric Gagne holds the major league record at 84.

Britton’s last blown save came on September 20, 2015, then converted two more saves before the end of the regular season. He went 47-for-47 in save chances last season and is six-for-six so far this year.

Along with his six saves, Britton has a 2.65 ERA and a 13/8 K/BB ratio in 17 innings this season. The lefty came off the disabled list earlier this month after missing two months with a strained left forearm.