Free Agency Preview: Catchers

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b molina.jpgThis is part one in a series of columns looking at this winter’s free agents, trade candidates and non-tender possibilities. I’ll be making predictions for the key free agents, but try not to take them too awfully seriously. The catchers are up first.
Bengie Molina (Giants) – While his stock appears to be down a bit, Molina still stands out as the top catcher available in free agency and should command a multiyear deal as a result. He’s hit between .265 and .295 with 15-20 homers in five straight seasons, and that kind of consistency will be valued, even by the teams that recognize his brutal OBP, not to mention his total lack of speed, makes him a weak option in the middle of the lineup. I count eight teams in the market for a starting catcher: the Astros, Blue Jays, Brewers, Giants, Mariners, Mets, Reds and Royals. Of the group, Seattle and San Francisco are the only clubs at all likely to stay in house. A return to the Giants is likely out for Molina unless a multiyear offer fails to materialize. They’re not going to want to block Buster Posey behind 2010. Prediction: Mets – two years, $11 million
Miguel Olivo (Royals) – Olivo had a career year, finishing with 23 homers and a 781 OPS, and the Royals still weren’t interested in bringing him back. It says a lot about him as a player. Olivo swings at everything, and it’s gotten him a .278 career OBP. He’s also frustrated his employers with his inconsistency behind the plate. He has the tools of a quality defensive catcher, but he’s awfully erratic. On the plus side, he really does have the power to hit 20 homers annually for a couple of more years. That skill figures to land him a starting job and perhaps a two-year deal. Prediction: Astros – one year, $5 million
Ramon Hernandez (Reds) – Declining Hernandez’s $8.5 million option was an easy call, but the Reds are interested in re-signing the 33-year-old, even though he hit an unimpressive .258/.336/.362 and played in only 81 games in his first season with the club. Hernandez would be a reasonable investment at half of the option price, and he’s not at all likely to get a multiyear deal after such a down year. He hasn’t been an above average catcher since 2006, but in such a weak field, he still seems like one of the better choices out there. Prediction: Reds – one year, $4 million
Yorvit Torrealba (Rockies) – The Rockies offered Torrealba a two-year deal to stick around as a part-timer, but he’s decided to explore his options. After all, even though Torrealba won back his old job in the second half, Chris Iannetta still figures to be the Rockies’ long-term catcher. Torrealba is a fine choice to start 60-70 games per year, but to push him beyond that would be to ask for trouble. He’s likely a plan B for a bunch of teams this winter. Prediction: Giants – one year, $3 million
Rod Barajas (Blue Jays) – The 19 homers and 71 RBI that Barajas produced in 2009 would have drawn more oohs and aahs in free agency if he wasn’t so similar yet inferior to Molina and Olivo offensively. Fortunately, he does rate as the best defensive catcher of the likely starters available in free agency. The Jays are kicking around the idea of bringing him back, though their interest in Chris Snyder suggested that Barajas is on the backburner. The 34-year-old seems just about perfect for Kansas City. Prediction: Royals – one year, $2.5 million
Ivan Rodriguez (Rangers) – After a nice August, Pudge ended up just as unproductive with the Rangers as he did in his four months with the Astros to begin 2009. In fact, he finished with OPSs in the 660s in both stops. Rodriguez is a future Hall of Famer, but at this point, it’s fine to think of him as Barajas without the power. Prediction: Rangers – one year, $1.5 million
Other free agents: Brian Schneider (Mets), Jason Kendall (Brewers), Gregg Zaun (Rays), Ramon Castro (White Sox), Jose Molina (Yankees), Josh Bard (Nationals), Henry Blanco (Padres), Brad Ausmus (Dodgers), Mike Redmond (Twins), Jason LaRue (Cardinals), Michael Barrett (Blue Jays), Chris Coste (Astros), Paul Bako (Phillies), Vance Wilson (Royals), Matt Treanor (Tigers), Chad Moeller (Orioles), Kevin Cash (Yankees), Jamie Burke (Nationals), Eliezer Alfonzo (Padres), Corky Miller (Reds), Mike Rabelo (Marlins), Eric Munson (Athletics), Rob Bowen (FA), Sal Fasano (Rockies), Paul Phillips (Rockies), Wilkin Castillo (Reds), Robby Hammock (Orioles)
Schneider and Kendall remain candidates to land starting jobs, no matter how much they’ve declined. Perhaps the Royals will bite, or the Mariners or Giants could latch on to one to serve as a bridge to the younger options. … Zaun and Castro are the cream of the backup crop. Jose Molina could also be viewed as part of that group, but it’d be a surprise if the Yankees didn’t bring him back. … Besides the Yankees, teams likely to sign backups include the Blue Jays, Cardinals, Diamondbacks, Nationals, Orioles, Padres, Phillies, Rangers, Rays, Rockies and White Sox. … Barrett can’t be completely forgotten about, but a lost 2009 due to injury probably means that he’ll have to head to the minors in an attempt to work his way back.
Trade candidates: Russell Martin (Dodgers), Mike Napoli (Angels), Ryan Doumit (Pirates), Kelly Shoppach (Indians), Gerald Laird (Tigers), Dioner Navarro (Rays), Chris Snyder (Diamondbacks), Taylor Teagarden (Rangers), Ronny Paulino (Marlins), Landon Powell (Athletics), Lou Marson (Indians), Bryan Anderson (Cardinals), J.R. Towles (Astros), Shawn Riggans (Rays), George Kottaras (Red Sox), Dusty Brown (Red Sox), Max Ramirez (Rangers), John Jaso (Rays), Clint Sammons (Braves), Robinzon Diaz (Pirates), Wyatt Toregas (Indians), Matt Pagnozzi (Cardinals)
It’d be an extreme case of selling low if the Dodgers parted with Martin now, and for what it’s worth, there’s been nothing recently to suggest it might happen. Oddly, the organization seems happier with him now than it did following his far superior 2008 season. … The Angels could keep Napoli and still provide Jeff Mathis with an expanded role if they decline to re-sign Vladimir Guerrero and give Napoli some time at DH. Still, Napoli’s name seems likely to come up, particularly if the Angels go asking the Jays about Roy Halladay.
Doumit seems more likely to go in an in-season deal since his stock is down. … Shoppach is due $2.5 million or so in arbitration, and the Indians could turn to Marson behind the plate. I wouldn’t be surprised at all to see Shoppach serving as Milwaukee’s catcher on Opening Day. … The Tigers could save money by moving Laird and going with Alex Avila and Dusty Brown behind the plate. … Snyder was nearly traded to Toronto already and almost certainly will go at some point, though perhaps not until spring training. … The Rangers have chosen Jarrod Saltalamacchia over Teagarden as their long-term catcher, though Salty’s shoulder surgery has increased the chances that Teagarden will stick around a little while longer. … I’m assuming that Powell will stay in Oakland as Kurt Suzuki’s backup, but the A’s would listen is someone wants him for an expanded role. He delivered seven homers and seven doubles in 140 at-bats last season.

Non-tender candidates: John Buck (Royals), Humberto Quintero (Astros), Mike Rivera (Brewers), Wil Nieves (Nationals), Raul Chavez (Blue Jays), Dusty Brown (Red Sox), Eli Whiteside (Giants), Ryan Budde (Angels), Jose Lobaton (Rays), Drew Butera (Twins), Luke Carlin (Diamondbacks)
Playing about half as often as usual, Buck quietly hit .247/.299/.484 in 186 at-bats to essentially match Olivo’s production in 2009. Still, the Royals want to blow up their catching situation and aren’t likely to tender him a contract. He’ll land another part-time gig at less than the $2.9 million he earned last season. … No one else here is particularly notable. Quintero and Rivera could keep their backup gigs if the Astros and Brewers, respectively, pick up true starting catchers. Neither is worthy of more than 30-40 starts per year.
2010-11 free agents: Joe Mauer (Twins), Victor Martinez (Red Sox), A.J. Pierzynski (White Sox), Gerald Laird (Tigers), Jason Varitek (Red Sox), John Buck (Royals), David Ross (Braves)
2011 options: N/A
2011-12 free agents: Yadier Molina (Cardinals)*, Jorge Posada (Yankees), Ryan Doumit (Pirates)*, Chris Snyder (Diamondbacks)*, Kelly Shoppach (Indians), Dioner Navarro (Rays)
2012 options: Molina – $7 million ($750,000 buyout), Doumit – $15.5 million option for 2012-13 ($500,000 buyout), Snyder – $6.75 million ($750,000 buyout)

Danny Espinosa reportedly skipped Nationals Winterfest because of Adam Eaton

WASHINGTON, DC - OCTOBER 13: Danny Espinosa #8 of the Washington Nationals celebrates after teammate Chris Heisey #14 (not pictured) hits a two run home run in the seventh inning against the Los Angeles Dodgers during game five of the National League Division Series at Nationals Park on October 13, 2016 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Rob Carr/Getty Images)
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According to Jorge Castillo of the Washington Post, Nationals infielder Danny Espinosa declined to attend the team’s annual Winterfest because of his dissatisfaction with management following their trade for outfielder Adam Eaton.

A source told Castillo that Espinosa’s unhappiness stemmed from a belief that the acquisition would jeopardize his starting role in 2017. With Eaton in center field, Trea Turner will likely return to his post at shortstop, leaving Espinosa out in the cold — or, as the case may be, on the bench. The move shouldn’t come as a big surprise to Espinosa, however, as Nationals’ GM Mike Rizzo spoke to the possibility of trading the infielder or reassigning him to a utility role back in early November.

Offensively, the 29-year-old had a down year in 2016, slashing just .209/.306/.378 with 24 home runs in 601 PA. Defensively, he still profiles among the top shortstops in the National League, with eight DRS (Defensive Runs Saved) and 8.3 Def (Defensive Runs Above Average) in his seventh year with the club.

Espinosa will reach free agency after the 2017 season.

Nick Cafardo: Red Sox should deal Pomeranz, not Buchholz

BOSTON, MA - SEPTEMBER 18: Drew Pomeranz #31 of the Boston Red Sox pitches during the first inning against the New York Yankees at Fenway Park on September 18, 2016 in Boston, Massachusetts. The Red Sox won 5-4. (Photo by Rich Gagnon/Getty Images)
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The Red Sox might be trying to move the wrong pitcher, according to the Boston Globe’s Nick Cafardo. Cafardo revealed that while the Sox have been trying to market right-hander Clay Buchholz, more teams would be interested in trades involving southpaw Drew Pomeranz.

The club appears reluctant to deal Pomeranz, especially because his price tag comes in at a cool $4.7 million to Buchholz’s $13.5 million in 2017. Those who have already expressed interest in the veteran hurlers, including the Twins, Mariners and Royals, also seem put off by Buchholz’s salary requirements as he enters his 32nd year.

Health could be another factor preventing teams from jumping to make trade offers, as Cafardo quotes an AL executive who believes the “medicals on both Pomeranz and Buchholz probably aren’t that great.” Neither pitcher suffered any major injuries during the 2016 season, though Pomeranz missed just over a week of play due to forearm soreness.

Pomeranz outperformed his fellow starter in 2016, pitching to a 3.32 ERA and career-best 9.8 K/9 through 170 2/3 innings with the Padres and Red Sox. He got off to an exceptionally strong start in San Diego, where his ERA dropped to 2.47 through the first half of the year before the Padres dealt him to Boston for minor league right-hander Anderson Espinoza. Buchholz, on the other hand, struggled with a 4.78 ERA and saw a decline in both his BB/9 and K/9 rates as he worked out a career-low 1.69 K/BB through 139 1/3 innings with the Sox.