Rockies shopping Brad Hawpe and Garrett Atkins

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Rockies general manager Dan O’Dowd said yesterday that he’s not actively looking to trade Brad Hawpe, but admitted that he’s listening to offers for the 30-year-old outfielder just weeks after saying that “we have no desire to move him at all.”
Hawpe is signed for $7.5 million next season and the Rockies hold a $10 million option or $500,000 buyout for 2011, but he’s become expendable with Dexter Fowler, Carlos Gonzalez, and Seth Smith providing younger, cheaper outfield options.
His outfield defense is awful, but Hawpe could be an attractive target for contenders looking to add a big bat to the middle of the lineup. Over the past four seasons he’s hit .288/.384/.518 with an OPS above .875 every year, and while Coors Field has no doubt padded his overall numbers Hawpe has batted .280/.375/.489 on the road. He’s a lifetime .283 hitter with 25-homer power and excellent plate discipline, and is essentially signed to a two-year, $17.5 million deal.
Meanwhile, the Denver Post reports that the Rockies also “continue to explore trade prospects” for Garrett Atkins and plan to release him if they can’t find a taker by November 20. Unlike with Hawpe, the market for Atkins figures to be non-existent. Or at least it should be. Saunders lists the Phillies, Angels, Rangers, and Orioles as possibly having interest, but over the past four seasons his OPS has dropped from .965 to .853 to .780 to .650 and he’s a career .252/.324/.411 hitter away from Coors Field.
Toss in poor defense at third base and Atkins is no longer starting material, let alone worth trading for and taking to arbitration following a season in which he earned $7 million. If the Rockies are interested in dealing Hawpe they should have no problem finding a taker willing to part with a decent prospect or two, but look for Atkins to hit the open market next week after being released. He’s now just a shell of the guy who hit .329/.406/.556 with 29 homers and 120 RBIs in 2006.

Joe Maddon: “I have a defensive foot fetish.”

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The Cubs’ defense — or lack thereof this year — has been a topic of conversation as it could help explain why the team hasn’t played at the elite level it played at last year.

Manager Joe Maddon tried to go into detail about that but ended up channeling his inner Rex Ryan. Via CSN Chicago’s Patrick Mooney.

Well then.

The Nationals have scored 62 runs during four Joe Ross starts

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If, in the future, Joe Ross ever complains about a lack of run support, point to his first four starts of the 2017 season.

Ross started on April 19 in Atlanta against the Braves, on April 25 in Colorado against the Rockies, on April 30 at home against the Mets, and on May 23 at home against the Mariners. In those games, the Nats’ offense scored 14, 15, 23, and 10 runs respectively for a total of 62 runs, or an average of 15.5 per start. Ross was the pitcher of record for seven, eight, 10, and 10 runs for a total of 35 runs (8.75 runs per start), which would still make him the major league leader in run support by that restrictive standard.

Among qualified starters — Ross did not qualify — entering Tuesday’s action, the Rockies’ Antonio Senzatela led the way according to ESPN, averaging 7.11 runs of support in nine starts. The Rockies scored double-digit runs in only three of those starts, oddly enough.

Per the Nationals, the 62 runs of support for Ross is a major league record in a pitcher’s first four starts of a season.