The McCourts: "a pattern of broken promises, deception, and misrepresentation."

Leave a comment

We’ve had a lot of blow by blow of the McCourt divorce, but today comes some added flavor in the form of a background piece on the power couple from the Boston Globe, their former hometown newspaper.  Lots of interesting detail, including one passage regarding their earlier bid to buy the Red Sox, which I think will ultimately color the entire situation, at least as it relates to the fate of the Dodgers:

“The seller was looking to sell, not swap a ball club for a parking
lot,” says a Major League Baseball official with knowledge of the
bidding. “There were guys writing checks for millions of dollars, and
Frank was offering a parking lot. He was never seriously considered.”

The McCourts’ ability to buy the Dodgers was a function of (a) Rupert Murdoch, the former Dodgers’ owner, being more interested in Boston parking lots than anyone else reasonably would be; and (b) the fact that, according to people inside the game, the McCourts are friends with Jerry Reinsdorf and others close to Selig, which made them much easier candidates to approve by Major League Baseball than other people to whom Murdoch could have offered the team. The McCourts had no real cash reserves then, and based on the divorce filings we’ve seen to date, have no cash now. Relatively speaking, of course.

The quoted bit in the headline comes from a lawsuit filed against the McCourts by the builders of one of their many homes. Those themes are echoed in their divorce filings and loom long over the fate of Dodgers.

Yasmany Tomas arrested for reckless driving and criminal speeding

Christian Petersen/Getty Images
23 Comments

KTAR News is reporting that Diamondbacks outfielder Yasmany Tomas was arrested on Thursday morning for driving faster than 100 MPH, according to the Arizona Department of Public Safety. He was charged with reckless driving and criminal speeding.

The maximum sentence for a criminal speeding charge is up to 30 days in jail and a fine up to $500. It is considered a Class 3 misdemeanor. Tomas may also have his license suspended.

A Diamondbacks spokesperson said, “We are very disappointed to learn of this news. We are still gathering facts, and will refrain from further comment at this time as this is a pending legal matter.”

Tomas, 27, signed a six-year, $68.5 million contract with the Diamondbacks in December 2014 as an amateur free agent out of Cuba. He has mostly disappointed, owning a .769 OPS while playing subpar defense in the outfield as well as at third base, where the club briefly tried him. He battled a groin injury for most of the past season and ultimately underwent core muscle surgery in August.