White Sox complete trade for Teahen, decline Dye's option

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After some non-denial denials from both sides, the White Sox and Royals made things official with the three-player trade reported yesterday: Mark Teahen to Chicago for Chris Getz and Josh Fields.
For a full breakdown of the deal check out my lengthy analysis from yesterday. Short version? Teahen is overrated and probably not worth the money he’s about to make. Getz and Fields are nothing special, but they’re cheap and somewhat useful. Good trade for the Royals.
Interestingly, general manager Ken Williams announced immediately that Teahen will be the White Sox’s starting third baseman, with Gordon Beckham sliding across the diamond to second base. Initial reports had Chicago targeting Teahen to replace Jermaine Dye in right field and that may still be an option if Williams ends up making a run at someone like Chone Figgins via free agency.
For now though Teahen is back to being a poor defensive third baseman rather than a poor offensive right fielder. In related news, the White Sox have declined their $12 million option on Dye for 2010, predictably choosing to buy him out for $1 million. Dye had a strong 2008 and hit .302/.375/.567 with 20 homers in the first half this season, but absolutely fell apart in the second half while batting just .179 in 60 games. Dye has bounced back from extended slumps before, but he’s 35 years old now and letting him go was a no-brainer at that price.

Aaron Judge set a new postseason strikeout record

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For a few days, it looked like Aaron Judge was finally hitting his stride in the postseason. He was still striking out at a regular clip, piling more and more strikeouts atop the 16 he racked up in the Division Series, but he was mashing, too. He engineered a three-run homer during Game 3 of the Championship Series, followed by another blast and game-tying double in Game 4. His one-out double helped pad a five-run lead in Game 5, while his 425-footer off of Brad Peacock barely made a dent during a 7-1 loss in Game 6. And then Lance McCullers‘ curveball found and fooled him, as it did five of the 14 batters it met in Game 7:

The strikeout was Judge’s first of the evening and 27th since the start of the playoffs. No other major league batter has racked up that many strikeouts in a single postseason, though Alfonso Soriano’s 26-strikeout record in 2003 comes the closest. Within that record, Judge also collected three golden sombreros (four strikeouts in a single game), narrowly avoiding the dreaded platinum sombrero (five strikeouts in a single game).

It’s an unfortunate footnote to a spectacular year for the rookie outfielder, who decimated the competition with 52 home runs and 8.2 fWAR during the regular season and was a pivotal part of the Yankees’ playoff run. Thankfully, the image of McCullers’ curveball darting just under Judge’s bat won’t be the image that sticks with us for years to come. Instead, it’ll look something like this: