Pirates to acquire Rays' Iwamura in exchange for reliever

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iwamura2.jpgRays second baseman Akinori Iwamura is headed to Pittsburgh, says the St. Petersburg Times and several other sources.
According to ESPN’s Buster Olney, right-hander Jesse Chavez will be the return when the deal is announced, something that might not happen until after the World Series concludes. The Rays are expected to surrender a second player along with Iwamura.
It’s a rather surprising destination, given that Iwamura is due $4.85 million next season and is only under control for 2010. The soon-to-be 31-year-old will become the Pirates’ highest-paid player.
Iwamura is worth the cash. In three years since arriving in the U.S., he’s hit .281/.354/.393 in 1349 at-bats. A knee injury limited him to 69 games in 2009, but he seemed to have his range back after returning in September. While Iwamura was initially a third baseman for Tampa Bay, he’s proven to be well above average at second base. He should be an upgrade over what Freddy Sanchez gave them defensively and approximately his equal offensively.
Still, one wonders if this is really the right direction for the Pirates. Second base tends to be a very easy position to fill in the offseason. Orlando Hudson, easily the top dog at the position, had to settle for an incentive-laden one-year deal last winter. He was guaranteed $3.4 million, with the chance to earn up to $8 million. Felipe Lopez ended up with a one-year, $3.5 million contract. Juan Uribe could only get a minor league deal. Had Iwamura become a free agent, it’s unlikely that he would have received a higher salary than the option called for. $8 million over two years seemed the most likely scenario.
Last year, the teams that tried to get a jump on the market usually ended up getting burned. The same could happen this winter.
With Iwamura locked in at second, the Pirates could now be looking at the following lineup:
CF Andrew McCutchen
2B Iwamura
LF Lastings Milledge
RF Garrett Jones
C Ryan Doumit
1B Jeff Clement/Steve Pearce
3B Andy LaRoche
SS Ronny Cedeno
They also have the option of picking up a right fielder and sticking Jones at first base.
The Rays, who needed to save money anyway, considered Iwamura expendable because of Ben Zobrist’s presence. Zobrist figures to be the team’s starting second baseman next year, though there is the chance he could end up in the outfield. Sean Rodriguez, who was picked up in the Scott Kazmir deal, will be the fallback at second.
Chavez will compete for a bullpen spot in spring training, and he should have a leg up on the competition. The former Rangers prospect had a 4.01 ERA and a 47/22 K/BB ratio in 67 1/3 innings as a 25-year-old rookie for the Pirates this year. He’s home-prone, something that’s going to be even more of an issue in the American League, and the odds are against him developing into a legitimate setup man. The Rays were just happy to get something in return for Iwamura and to be off the hook for having to pay the buyout on his option.

A fan was attacked, injured outside Dodger Stadium on Friday

Dodger Stadium


The Los Angeles Times reports that there was a fight in the parking lot outside of Dodger Stadium on Friday night that put a fan in critical condition. The fight occurred following the Dodgers Game 1 loss to the Mets when an argument between fans escalated. It is unclear whether the fight was between fans of the rival teams.

Of course fan-in-fan violence is nothing new to Dodger Stadium and everyone recalls the Opening Day 2011 attack of Giants fan Bryan Stow which left him severely injured and brain damaged.

Here’s hoping the hospitalized fan recovers quickly.

Playoff Reset: The Cards and Dodgers have their backs against the wall

Clayton Kershaw

Historically speaking, the Cardinals and Dodgers are the class of the National League. A couple of organizations which have won a ton, have had a lot of classy alpha-types running their respective shows over the years, no shortage of glory, no shortage of history and enough evocative and grand footage in the can to make Ken Burns sepia with envy.

Meanwhile, the Cubs and Mets, while they’ve won some and have some wonderful history too, are far better known for their failures. For dubious achievements and fan bases which have, collectively, spent far more time smacking their own foreheads than high-fiving the guy in the seat next to them. Nevertheless, by the time we go to bed tonight it’s quite possible that the classy organizations with the long resumes of winning baseball will have been eliminated by the sad sacks and that we’re going to be treated to a Mets-Cubs NLCS.

In short: today’s NLDS contests are “the big game” sequences in any late-70s-mid-90s “slobs vs. snobs” comedy movie. Camp Mohawk vs. Camp Northstar. Lane Meyer vs. Roy Stalin skiing the K-12. Thornton Mellon vs. Chas in the diving meet. Once these things are over don’t be surprised to see someone on the Mets or Cubs kissing some girl way out of their league and to be asking yourself, “wait, why are there cheerleaders at a diving meet?”

Of course baseball isn’t as scripted as all of that and William Zabka is, according to IMDb, in pre-production on some Civil War project, so he can’t make it. I have no idea what that’s about. I can only assume he’s playing some stuck-up Confederate General who will lose to Curtis Armstrong’s disheveled Union general in The Big Battle, after which we cut to credits over some tossed-off Dave Edmunds song he wrote for the soundtrack just for the money.

Which is to say: we have to watch these games to see what happens:

The Game: St. Louis Cardinals vs. Chicago Cubs
The Time: 4:37 p.m. ET
The Place: Wrigley Field
The Channel: TBS
The Starters: John Lackey vs. Jason Hammel
The Upshot: Wow, those were a lot of dingers given up by Michael Wacha and his friends last night, huh? The good news is that they’re running Lackey out there this afternoon and Lackey has owned the Cubs of late, going 3-0 with a 0.93 ERA in four starts against them, including his gem in Game 1 on Friday night. The bad news: even a half dozen recent starts aren’t great predictively speaking, and Lackey is on short rest. TBS will show highlights of Lackey pitching on short rest in the 2002 World Series today, but think about what you were doing in 2002 and whether you’d be just as good at it today as then. Hammel has the ball for the Cubs. He has not fared well against the Cardinals this season (5.37 ERA) but the same small sample stuff applies.

Injuries could be a key consideration here, as Addison Russell may be on the shelf for the Cubs following his hamstring tweak in last night’s game. Likewise Yadier Molina left early, apparently having aggravated his thumb injury. Otherwise: wear a helmet if you’re in the Bleachers at Wrigley this afternoon. Balls may be flying out your way.

The Game: Los Angels Dodgers vs. New York Mets
The Time: 8:07 p.m. ET
The Place: Citi Field
The Channel: TBS
The Starters: Clayton Kershaw vs. Steven Matz
The Upshot: The Clayton Kershaw Legacy Game. It’s not fair to Kershaw that, after eight years of completely dominating Major League Baseball people will deem him worthy or unworthy of, well, whatever, based on his 10th postseason start, but they will. If he falters today on short rest, with no reliable bullpen to bail him out, people will call him some sort of choke artist. If he dominates he’ll be considered redeemed, though he’s never been a guy in need of redemption. I don’t care much for that game, but it’s inevitable it will be played so let’s just silently roll our eyes and go with it. The Mets may have a bigger question mark on the mound in Steven Matz, who hasn’t pitched in a couple of weeks thanks to a tweak in his back in the last week of the season.

This should feel like a totally different game. The Utley drama has to subside now, especially given that he’s unlikely to get the start against a tough lefty. And that tough lefty is, with all due respect, no Brett Anderson. You can bet against Clayton Kershaw and win, but it’s not the sort of thing I’d make a habit of.

In any event, the Cubs and Mets should play this on a loop in the Clubhouse before today’s games. Because . . . it just doesn’t matter!

Yoenis Cespedes and his bat flip say good morning

Yoenis Cespedes

It was a late night last night. Especially for old farts like me. I turned on my TV at 12:30 yesterday afternoon and there was baseball on it for just about 12 hours straight. Not too shabby unless you happen to root for the Astros, Rangers, Cardinals or Dodgers. Oh well, today is another day. Or tomorrow if today is a travel day.

In the meantime, we have Yoenis Cespedes to keep us happy, alert and occupied. Again, unless you’re a Dodgers fan. Of course, if you are a Dodgers fan you got absolutely no right to be upset at a bat flip following a homer. And if I catch you complaining, you’re getting a time out.