Myers calls out Hamels: 'I thought you quit'

Leave a comment

hamels-091102.standard[1].jpgPhillies pitcher Cole Hamels dropped a rather shocking quote after pitching poorly in a loss to the Yankees in Game 3, saying he couldn’t “wait for it to end. It’s been mentally draining. At year’s end, you just can’t wait for a fresh start.”

His comments stunned manager Charlie Manuel, who said he “didn’t understand it”, and apparently didn’t sit well with at least one of his teammates, leading to a confrontation after Game 5 (via Yahoo!):

Phillies pitchers Brett Myers and Cole Hamels had a short but tense confrontation in the team’s clubhouse following Game 5 of the World Series, according to one witness, words that stemmed from Hamels’ recent statement that he was eager for his season to end.
As Myers walked past Hamels near Hamels’ locker he said, mocking, “What are you doing here? I thought you quit.”

According to the report, Hamels responded with a word you can’t print in a family baseball blog, and then was led away by a team official before things could get out of hand.

If Myers is willing to call out Hamels in the locker room, you have to wonder if there are others on the team thinking along the same lines. As if the Phillies don’t have enough problems in trying to take two from the Yankees in the Bronx, now they have a potential clubhouse rift.

On top of everything else, if the Phillies manage to take Game 6 behind Pedro Martinez, Hamels is on schedule to start Game 7. Do Manuel and company really want to put a guy out there in that situation who might not be mentally ready to go?

To Hamels’ credit, he clarified his comments on Monday, essentially admitting he was dumb, and that he had lost sleep over the mini-controversy.

“I went to Charlie just to talk to him because that’s who I am, and I think he understands that,” Hamels said. “I just wanted to tell him my true thoughts – that I’ll never ever quit. I want to play this game until somebody takes it away from me.

He’ll never quit. No matter how badly he wants the season to be over. Stay tuned for a potential Game 7. Things could get interesting.

Go here to follow me on Twitter. For more baseball news, go to NBCSports.com.

Must-Click Link: Mets owners are cheap, unaccountable and unconcerned

Getty Images
2 Comments

Marc Carig of Newsday took Mets owners Fred and Jeff Wilpon to the woodshed over the weekend. He, quite justifiably, lambasted them for their inexplicable frugality, their seeming indifference to wanting to put a winning team on the field and, above all else, their unwillingness to level with the fans or the press about the team’s plans or priorities.

Mets ownership is unaccountable, Carig argues, asking everything of fans and giving nothing in the way of a plan or even hope in return:

Mets fans ought to know where their money is going, because it’s clear that much of it isn’t ending up on the field . . . They never talk about money. Whether it’s arrogance or simply negligence, they have no problem asking fans to pony up the cash and never show the willingness to reciprocate.

And they’re not just failing to be forthcoming with the fans. Even the front office is in the dark about the direction of the team at any given time:

According to sources, the front office has only a fuzzy idea of what they actually have to spend in any given offseason. They’re often flying blind, forced to navigate the winter under the weight of an invisible salary cap. This is not the behavior of a franchise that wants to win.

Carig is not a hot take artist and is not usually one to rip a team or its ownership like this. As such, it should not be read as a columnist just looking to bash the Wilpons on a slow news day. To the contrary, this reads like something well-considered and a long time in the works. It has the added benefit of being 100% true and justified. The Mets have been run like a third rate operation for years. Even when the product on the field is good, fans have no confidence that ownership will do what it takes to maintain that success.

All that seems to matter to the Wilpons is the bottom line and everything flows from there. They may as well be making sewing machines or selling furniture.