Jamie McCourt to the Dodgers: "Get out of my divorce"

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Jamie McCourt still wants to own the Dodgers, she just doesn’t want them filing legal briefs in which the team accuses her of cheating on her husband:

Jamie McCourt argued in a motion Monday that the Dodgers should not be a party in a divorce hearing, asking the court to throw out papers filed in the team’s name that “unnecessarily and gratuitously attack” her.

The motion is expected to be considered Thursday in Los Angeles Superior Court as part of a hearing to determine the validity of McCourt’s demand for immediate reinstatement as the Dodgers’ chief executive.

I think she has a good point here, because if anyone should be allowed to “gratuitously attack” her for messing around with her bodyguard (or whatever he is), it shouldn’t be the Dodgers, who actually made the filing she’s complaining about. It should be her husband Frank, and so far he’s been missing from this affair.  At least technically so. Fact is that the “Dodgers'” papers were written and filed by Frank’s own divorce lawyer, which means that Frank is trying to use the team’s good name to advance legal arguments he doesn’t necessarily want to make himself. 

In reality, the Dodgers probably have a place in the lawsuit insofar as Jamie has asked to be reinstated, and the Dodgers, as an entity, probably have a right to say that they do not want to be forced to re-hire a terminated employee. They should not, however, be used as Frank’s sock puppet to accuse their former employee of being an unfaithful hussy who shouldn’t have her job back.  If Frank wants to accuse his wife of stuff, he should man up and say it himself in his own legal papers. Businesses are generally well-advised to not publicly comment on the reasons why someone gets fired.

Bonus reason for kicking the Dodgers out of the suit: it will prevent these overpaid children from further dragging a once proud and respectable  brand name into the muck.

Red Sox could go to arbitration hearing with Fernando Abad

BOSTON, MA - SEPTEMBER 16:  Fernando Abad #58 of the Boston Red Sox pitches against the New York Yankees during the ninth inning at Fenway Park on September 16, 2016 in Boston, Massachusetts.  (Photo by Maddie Meyer/Getty Images)
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The Red Sox are expecting to go to an arbitration hearing with left-handed reliever Fernando Abad, per Pete Abraham of the Boston Globe. Red Sox president Dave Dombrowski said there was a “decent chance” a hearing would be necessary after countering Abad’s $2.7 million request with $2 million.

Abad, 31, pitched just 12 2/3 innings for Boston after the club acquired him from Minnesota at the trade deadline last season. The lefty earned a cumulative 3.66 ERA, 4.2 BB/9 and 7.9 SO/9 for the two teams in 2016. He received $1.25 million in 2016 and will remain under club control (through arbitration) in 2017. A $2.7 million salary would be a hefty increase for the veteran reliever, who has seen a significant decline since he put up a 1.57 ERA for the Athletics in 2014 and who has not amassed more than 0.6 fWAR in any single season to date.

While the Red Sox aren’t close to settling with Abad, Evan Drellich of the Boston Herald reports that they may be closing in on a settlement with left-handed starter Drew Pomeranz. Pomeranz filed at $5.7 million, while the Sox felt more comfortable at $3.6 million. The two are expected to meet somewhere in the middle to avoid an arbitration hearing later this winter.

Report: Braves sign Kurt Suzuki

KANSAS CITY, MO - AUGUST 20: Kurt Suzuki #8 of the Minnesota Twins hits against the Kansas City Royals at Kauffman Stadium on August 20, 2016 in Kansas City, Missouri. (Photo by Ed Zurga/Getty Images)
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The Braves reportedly have a deal in place with free agent catcher Kurt Suzuki, per Chris Cotillo of SB Nation. FOX Sports’ Ken Rosenthal adds that the contract is for one year, $1.5 million with up to $2.5 million in additional incentives.

Suzuki, 33, completed a three-year track with the Twins in 2016, slashing .258/.301/.403 with eight home runs in 373 PA. The veteran backstop likely won’t provide an offensive or defensive upgrade over current starter Tyler Flowers, but should give the Braves some depth at a position they’ve been looking to strengthen since the start of the offseason.

The team has yet to confirm the deal.