Jamie McCourt to the Dodgers: "Get out of my divorce"

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Jamie McCourt still wants to own the Dodgers, she just doesn’t want them filing legal briefs in which the team accuses her of cheating on her husband:

Jamie McCourt argued in a motion Monday that the Dodgers should not be a party in a divorce hearing, asking the court to throw out papers filed in the team’s name that “unnecessarily and gratuitously attack” her.

The motion is expected to be considered Thursday in Los Angeles Superior Court as part of a hearing to determine the validity of McCourt’s demand for immediate reinstatement as the Dodgers’ chief executive.

I think she has a good point here, because if anyone should be allowed to “gratuitously attack” her for messing around with her bodyguard (or whatever he is), it shouldn’t be the Dodgers, who actually made the filing she’s complaining about. It should be her husband Frank, and so far he’s been missing from this affair.  At least technically so. Fact is that the “Dodgers'” papers were written and filed by Frank’s own divorce lawyer, which means that Frank is trying to use the team’s good name to advance legal arguments he doesn’t necessarily want to make himself. 

In reality, the Dodgers probably have a place in the lawsuit insofar as Jamie has asked to be reinstated, and the Dodgers, as an entity, probably have a right to say that they do not want to be forced to re-hire a terminated employee. They should not, however, be used as Frank’s sock puppet to accuse their former employee of being an unfaithful hussy who shouldn’t have her job back.  If Frank wants to accuse his wife of stuff, he should man up and say it himself in his own legal papers. Businesses are generally well-advised to not publicly comment on the reasons why someone gets fired.

Bonus reason for kicking the Dodgers out of the suit: it will prevent these overpaid children from further dragging a once proud and respectable  brand name into the muck.

Report: Mets ownership backs Terry Collins

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The Mets entered Sunday night’s game against the Pirates with a disappointing 20-27 record. While the club has dealt with a litany of injuries, manager Terry Collins has also drawn criticism for in-game decision-making, particularly regarding his decision-making.

Owner Fred Wilpon is still Collins’ strongest supporter, however, Newsday’s Marc Carig reports. As a result, the team is unlikely to make a managerial change anytime soon. If the Mets continue to struggle, though, ownership may feel pressured to make a change.

Collins became the longest-tenured manager in Mets history last week. Collins managed the Mets to a 77-85 record in 2011 and has overall helped the club go 501-518, winning the NL Pennant in 2015. He is not signed to a contract beyond this season.

Joe Mauer becomes first Twin to reach base seven times in a game since Rod Carew

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Twins first baseman Joe Mauer had a game for the record books on Sunday against the Rays. He finished 4-for-5 with an RBI double, a solo home run, two singles, and three walks in eight plate appearances. Unfortunately for him, the Twins still lost 8-6 in 15 innings.

ESPN’s Stats & Info notes that Mauer is the first Twin to reach base seven times in one game since Rod Carew in 1972 against the Brewers. The last player to reach base seven times in one game (without the aid of an error) was Giants shortstop Brandon Crawford on August 8 last season against the Marlins. The feat has only been accomplished seven times this decade, so about once a year.

After Sunday’s game, Mauer is batting .283/.363/.408 with three home runs, 18 RBI, and 23 runs scored in 171 plate appearances. Not too shabby.