Wanna buy a Hall of Famer's corked bat?

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Going to the highest bidder:

This is a 1983-85 Robin Yount Louisville Slugger Professional Model Game Used Corked Bat. This bat dates to the 1983-85 period based on the Louisville Slugger centerbrand period, and the Louisville Slugger factory records, which indicate that Yount ordered the P72C 35″ no finish model bat during the entire 1983-85 centerbrand period . . . The very interesting part of this bat, and what makes it special is the apparent corking, a trait banned by MLB rules, visible inside of the cupped barrel end, which slightly distorts the jersey number 19. 

I’m not sure what’s harder to believe: that a Hall of Famer like Yount might have corked his bat or that he actually believed hitting with a corked bat helps in the first place. Because it almost certainly does not.

UPDATE:  A friend of mine who is much smarter than I am read the linked corked bat-debunking and finds considerable fault with it.  He’s right: it’s a highly qualified article that, if anything, could be read to actually establish that corked bats do, indeed, confer a benefit on the hitter.  I’ll admit that I didn’t read the article too closely before I linked it this morning. I had simply read multiple debunkings of corked bats in the past, and at first glance assumed that was one ’em.  We can do better than that, so here’s Mythbusters. They’re on TV, so they HAVE to be more credible, right? 

(link via Monozygotic)

The Rays announce “The Rays Tank.” Really.

Tampa Bay Rays
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Earlier this offseason the Rays traded away franchise player Evan Longoria. Over the weekend they traded starter Jake Odorizzi to the Twins and designated All-Star outfielder Corey Dickerson for assignment. These were clearly financially driven moves, and now the Rays sport a payroll of less than $70 million. The club’s offseason moves prompted Longoria to say that he feels sorry for Rays fans.

If you asked Rays brass, I’m sure they’d make strong statements defending all of these moves while offering evidence-light arguments that, yes, they truly are interested in fielding a competitive team in 2018. They would likely react VERY angrily to any suggestion that they are tanking this year. Teams never admit that they’re tanking.

In other news, the Rays announced a new blog:

Oh.