Wells for Bradley trade "has some legs"

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While the Blue Jays lost pitching coach Brad Arnsberg to the Astros on Friday night, things are looking up with the rumors of a possible Vernon Wells-for-Milton Bradley trade.

According to the Toronto Sun, Chicago would be willing to split the
difference on the monies owed to the two players — Wells’ $107 million
and Bradley’s $21 million — for a difference of $86 million. Each side
would absorb $43 million.

It sounds far-fetched right now, especially since the Cubs are believed
to be talking to a few teams, but according to one Cubs official, the
idea “has some legs.”

At least Wells played in 158 games in 2009 (most since 2003), but he
turned in a lowly .260/.311/.400 line with 15 home runs, 66 RBI and 17
stolen bases. His .711 OPS was sixth from the bottom among outfielders
with at least 500 plate appearances. Also, according to UZR/150,
Wells has been one of the worst defensive center fielders in the sport
over the past two seasons. Bradley, of course, was suspended for the
rest of the season on September 20 after putting up a disappointing
.257/.378/.397 line.

The clear winner here would be the Blue Jays, who would only have to
pay for two years of the volatile Bradley, while Wells still has six
years left on his deal. It would also give the Cubs one of the more
expensive outfields in the sport, with Alfonso Soriano owed $90 million
over the next five seasons and Kosuke Fukudome owed $26.5 million over
the next two seasons. Each have full no-trade clauses.

It sounds improbable right now, but if the Cubs are this desperate for suitors, it would make more
sense for Jim Hendry to swallow some pride and eat the $21 million owed
to Bradley instead of taking on an increasingly unproductive and aging Wells. It’s not
like Bradley’s is a Barry Zito-type contract. They could find a find a far
more productive player than Wells for a fraction of the price.

DOJ settles antirust lawsuit against cable companies who don’t carry Dodgers games

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Last November, the U.S. Department of Justice sued AT&T, accusing its subsidiary, DirecTV, of being the ringleader in a plot in which it conspired with Cox Communications, Charter Communications and AT&T cable (then a separate company), to refuse to carry SportsNet LA, the Dodger-owned TV channel in violation of antitrust laws.

Now that lawsuit is over. DOJ has settled with AT&T last night.

The bad news: no part of the settlement obligates DirecTV or any of the other alleged co-conspirators to carry Dodgers games or to even negotiate to that end. There is likewise no fine or truly substantive penalty. It’s basically a “do not do this again!” agreement with some antitrust training requirements for executives and some orders to monitor their communications about these things.

“We are pleased to have resolved this matter to the satisfaction of all parties,” and AT&T spokesman said yesterday, likely in the tone of a guy who is pretty happy to have had a major antitrust suit against him settled so quickly.

When the suit was filed, I anticipated a settlement, as most antitrust suits brought by the DOJ are settled. Such a settlement could’ve featured a cash penalty or, more significantly, a brokered agreement between the parties in question in lieu of a cash settlement that could’ve led to Dodgers games being carried on more channels. After all, more competition is the end game of the Antirust Division.

As it is, however, it’s hard to see this as anything other than a surrender by the DOJ and a victory for the those carriers who coordinated their efforts to not carry the Dodgers.

An open question, unanswered in anyone’s statements yesterday, is whether this settlement is 100% about the merits of the case — keeping in mind that the DOJ tends not file antitrust suits unless they think they can win, instead preferring to negotiate first — or whether it represents a new set of laxer priorities when it comes to antitrust enforcement from the Trump Administration and AG Jeff Sessions.

Video: Jake Arrieta hits a 465-foot home run off of Zack Greinke

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Jake Arrieta‘s bat is in midseason form already. The Cubs’ ace swatted a solo home run to center field off of Zack Greinke in Thursday afternoon’s Grapefruit League exhibition game, his first homer of the spring.

The blast went 465 feet, according to MLB.com’s Daren Willman.

Arrieta has hit two home runs in each of the past two seasons. Madison Bumgarner (eight) and Noah Syndergaard (four) are the only other pitchers to match or exceed his output in that department.

Greinke, meanwhile, is hoping to bounce back after a miserable 2016 season. He finished with an uncharacteristic 4.37 ERA in 26 starts in his first year with the Diamondbacks.